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dc.contributor.authorBarker, Rachel M.
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-23T02:22:02Z
dc.date.available2010-03-23T02:22:02Z
dc.date.issued1989
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1541
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study is to gather comprehensive information on trampers and guided walkers, in order to understand the changing nature and diversity of their recreation needs. Specialisation theory is used to gather this information, and to focus on recreation behaviour. The basis of this theory is that recreationists may be categorised on the level of experience and commitment to their recreation activity from novice, generalist to specialist. My study uses specialisation theory to examine the characteristics and experiences of trampers and guided walkers in the Greenstone Valley (in the Queenstown/ Fiordland area). Information was collected by structured interviews with 320 trampers and guided walkers and in-depth interviews with 45 experienced trampers. Three important dimensions of specialisation are identified in analysis; source of information, commitment and experience. A comparison of specialisation is made of anglers and trampers, and major differences are highlighted between these user groups. While specialisation has relatively simple application for anglers, the theory is more complicated with trampers. Specialisation theory would benefit from a more precise overall definition. However, specialisation theory makes a useful contribution to the understanding of backcountry users. It complements other outdoor recreation planning systems. Specialisation theory identifies specific recreation needs which may aid management of future backcountry users.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterbury
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectspecialisationen
dc.subjecttrampingen
dc.subjectguided walkersen
dc.subjectrecreation experienceen
dc.subjectcommitmenten
dc.subjectGreenstone Valleyen
dc.subjectsurveysen
dc.subjecttrekkingen
dc.subjectrecreation managementen
dc.titleTramping and specialisation theory: trampers and guided walkers in the Greenstone Valley : A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Applied Science in the University of Canterbury, Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism Lincoln Collegeen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::350000 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services::350500 Tourismen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::370400 Human Geography::370403 Recreation and leisure studiesen
lu.thesis.supervisorDevlin, Pat
lu.thesis.supervisorPerkins, Harvey
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sport
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. If you are the author of this item, please contact us if you wish to discuss making the full text publicly available.en


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