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dc.contributor.authorEl-Shafie, Mervat
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-09T02:49:21Z
dc.date.available2010-04-09T02:49:21Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1627
dc.description.abstractThe research problem is defined as how to interpret the impacts of modernity and globalization upon the quality of built environment and its phenomenal effect of "placelessness" of modern humans. The investigation approaches the problem by analogy, focusing upon the impact of modernity upon a remote desert community. Contemporary theoretical approaches to the problem of placelessness are outlined, and an argument made that a phenomenological perspective is fundamental to better understanding. A qualitative approach is therefore used as the methodological framework to explore different aspects of the way that built environment is expressed. Through this investigation the research seeks to better understand issues of development of built environment in countries such as Egypt. An understanding of the experience of dwelling in a remote desert community is developed through the case study of Siwa oasis. The integration of inner and outer horizons of built environment in Siwa is revealed in the experience of everyday life of work, entertainment, rituals and belief. The relationship of humans to the natural environment was characterised in Siwa by the relationship between house and garden. The interconnection between everyday life experience, dwelling and society is expressed in layers of meaning in natural private and public space of built environment. It is concluded that our most fundamental relationships with nature are grounded in everyday life experiences that are involving, harmonious and ultimately reciprocal.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectbuilt environmenten
dc.subjectphenomenologyen
dc.subjectSiwaen
dc.subjectvernacular architectureen
dc.subjectcultural landscapeen
dc.subjectcommunity in placeen
dc.subjectmodernityen
dc.subjectcritical regionalismen
dc.subjectgrounded theoryen
dc.subjectanalogyen
dc.subjectdwelling experienceen
dc.subjecthorizons of beingen
dc.subjectsense of placeen
dc.titlePhenomenology of built environment: interpreting the relationship between people and nature in remote communities: the Siwan experienceen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::370400 Human Geography::370402 Social and cultural geographyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::370100 Sociology::370109 Environmental Sociologyen
lu.thesis.supervisorKirby, Val
lu.thesis.supervisorBerno, Tracy
lu.thesis.supervisorSwaffield, Simon
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen


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