Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVink Cor, J.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-16T00:03:47Z
dc.date.issued2002en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1674
dc.description.abstractThe 27 species of Lycosidae found in New Zealand were revised. One species in the genus Allotrochosina Roewer, 1960; twenty species in the genus Anoteropsis L. Koch, 1878, of which 11 were new species (alpina, hlesti, cantuaria,forsteri, halli, insularis, lacustris, litoralis, montana, okalainae, and westlandica); three new species in the genus Artoria Thorell, 1877 (hospita, segrega, and separata); one species in the genus Geolycosa Montgomery, 1904; one species in the new genus Notocosa; one species in the genus Venatrix Roewer, 1960. All genera and species were described, with information on synonymy, type data, material examined, geographical distribution and sub familial status. A key to adults was constructed and habitus images of adults, illustrations of important structural features and distribution maps have been provided. A phylogeny for the genus Anoteropsis was inferred using parsimony analysis of morphological characters and contained significant phylogenetic structure. The phylogeny of Anoteropsis was further investigated using molecular data to test for congruence with the morphological data and the monophyly of widespread species. Data sets from the mitochondrial gene regions NADH dehydrogenase subunit I (ND1) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) of the 20 species in the New Zealand genus Anoteropsis were generated. Two species of Artoria were also sequenced and used as an outgroup. Species with a large distribution within New Zealand were represented by two or more specimens to test for monophyly or cryptic species. Sequence data were phylogenetically analysed using parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses. Sequence data was combined with a previously generated morphological data set and phylogenetic ally analysed using parsimony. The ND1 region sequenced included part of tRNA Leu(CUN), which appears to have an unstable amino-acyl arm and no TψC arm in lycosids. Analyses supported the existence of five main species groups within Anoteropsis and the monophyly of the species. Maximum likelihood analyses appears to provide better resolution of the deeper phylogenetic structure within Anoteropsis. Phylogenies generated from the COI data set show inconsistencies with the ND1 and morphological trees and caution is advised when using COI to estimate spider phylogenies. A radiation of Anoteropsis species within the last five million years is inferred from the ND1 likelihood phylogram, habitat and geological data. The relationship of New Zealand wolf spiders to Australian, Asian and Holarctic genera was investigated to ensure the correct generic placement of New Zealand species. A data set from the mitochondrial12S rRNA gene subunit of 11 Australasian lycosid species (six New Zealand species and five Australian species), three North American lycosid species, one European lycosid species and one New Zealand pisaurid (outgroup) were generated. They were combined with the published sequences of 12 European lycosids, two Asian lycosids and one Asian pisaurid and were phylogenetic ally analysed using parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses. Analysis revealed that Australasian species form clades distinct from Palearctic and Holarctic species providing further evidence against the placement of Australasian species in Northern Hemisphere genera. There is evidence that New Zealand wolf spiders are related to a subset of Australian genera whereas the other Australian lycosid genera are related to Asian/Holarctic faunas. 12S gene sequences were useful when examining relationships between closely related genera, but were not as informative for deeper generic relationships. Analyses supported the existence of five main species groups within Anoteropsis and the monophyly of the species. Maximum likelihood analyses appears to provide better resolution of the deeper phylogenetic structure within Anoteropsis. Phylogenies generated from the COI data set show inconsistencies with the ND1 and morphological trees and caution is advised when using COI to estimate spider phylogenies. A radiation of Anoteropsis species within the last five million years is inferred from the ND1 likelihood phylogram, habitat and geological data. The relationship of New Zealand wolf spiders to Australian, Asian and Holarctic genera was investigated to ensure the correct generic placement of New Zealand species. A data set from the mitochondrial12S rRNA gene subunit of 11 Australasian lycosid species (six New Zealand species and five Australian species), three North American lycosid species, one European lycosid species and one New Zealand pisaurid (outgroup) were generated. They were combined with the published sequences of 12 European lycosids, two Asian lycosids and one Asian pisaurid and were phylogenetic ally analysed using parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses. Analysis revealed that Australasian species form clades distinct from Palearctic and Holarctic species providing further evidence against the placement of Australasian species in Northern Hemisphere genera. There is evidence that New Zealand wolf spiders are related to a subset of Australian genera whereas the other Australian lycosid genera are related to Asian/Holarctic faunas.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectLycosidaeen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectAustraliaen
dc.subjectlycosid generaen
dc.subjectlycosid subfamiliesen
dc.subjecttaxonomic revisionen
dc.subjectAllotrochrosinaen
dc.subjectAnoteropsisen
dc.subjectArtoriaen
dc.subjectGeolycosaen
dc.subjectNotocosaen
dc.subjectVenatrixen
dc.subjectphylogenyen
dc.subject12Sen
dc.subjectND1en
dc.subjectCOIen
dc.subjectcombined analysisen
dc.titleThe taxonomy and systematics of New Zealand lycosidae (wolf spiders)en
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::270000 Biological Sciences::270500 Zoology::270505 Entomologyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::270000 Biological Sciences::270500 Zoology::270501 Animal systematics, taxonomy and phylogenyen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Pest Management and Conservationen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/ECOL
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-4237-0117


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail
Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record