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dc.contributor.authorStewart Glenn, H.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-16T02:51:01Z
dc.date.issued2002-08en
dc.identifier.isbn0-478-22299-8en
dc.identifier.issn1175-6519en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1679
dc.description.abstractThis report reviews the literature on regeneration requirements of main canopy tree species in Westland. Forests managed for production purposes have to be harvested in an ecologically sustainable way; to maintain their natural character, harvesting should facilitate regeneration of target species and ensure that their recruitment is in proportion to the extent of extraction. The reasons for species establishing at any point in time are unclear; however, they are probably related to the availability of suitable microsites for establishment, the size of the canopy openings formed by disturbance, and whether or not seeds are available at or around the time of the disturbance. Age structures from throughout Westland show that extensive, similar-aged, post-earthquake cohorts of trees are a feature of the region. This suggests that infrequent, massive earthquakes are the dominant coarse-scale disturbance agent, triggering episodes of major erosion and sedimentation and leaving a strong imprint in the forest structure. In other forests, flooding and catastrophic windthrow are major forms of disturbance. The findings suggest that, in general, large disturbances are required for conifer regeneration. This has implications for any sustained yield management of these forests if conifers are to remain an important component. Any harvesting should recognise the importance for tree establishment of: forest floor microsites, such as fallen logs and tree tip-up mounds; and the variable way in which canopy gaps are formed. Harvesting should maintain the 'patchy' nature of the natural forest—large patches of dense conifers interspersed with more heterogeneous patches of mixed species.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis is a client report commissioned by West Coast Conservancy and funded from the Unprogrammed Science Advice fund.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsCopyright © August 2002, New Zealand Department of Conservationen
dc.subjectcanopy gapen
dc.subjectindigenous forestsen
dc.subjectregeneration requirementsen
dc.subjectspecies differencesen
dc.subjectmicrositesen
dc.subjectWestlanden
dc.titleStructure and canopy tree species regeneration requirements in indigenous forests, Westland, New Zealanden
dc.typeReport
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300600 Forestry Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DEM
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
lu.subtypeCommissioned Reporten


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