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dc.contributor.authorHenderson, R.en
dc.contributor.authorRoss, James G.en
dc.contributor.authorFrampton, Christopher M.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-16T04:44:11Z
dc.date.issued2002-05en
dc.identifier.issn1175-6519en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1683
dc.description.abstractThree types of long-life stoat bait (polymer, paste, and gel) were formulated from natural and synthetic bait ingredients after extensive testing of potential ingredients. Feeding trials demonstrated that baits containing natural extracts from rabbit and chicken were preferred to bait that contained only processed meals and synthetic flavours. The addition of preservatives and waterproofing agents to improve bait longevity, lowered palatability markedly in all bait types. The texture of bait also affected the amount of bait eaten, with most stoats rejecting baits that were hard or needed to be chewed before they could be swallowed. In this study, significantly more long-life polymer and paste bait was eaten than gel bait. The polymer bait remained palatable after one month in the field. Although all long-life bait formulations tested were less palatable than fresh meat, most stoats (i.e. ≥90%) consumed sufficient quantities of polymer and paste baits to receive a lethal dose (>5 g) if baits had contained a toxin. This was similar to the percentage of stoats eating pricked eggs, and better than consumption of non-pricked hen eggs. Methods for further increasing bait consumption and extending their effectiveness over time are being assessed, the ultimate goal being a long-life bait that is as palatable as fresh meat.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis report originated from work carried out under Department of Conservation investigation no.3435.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsCopyright © May 2002, New Zealand Department of Conservationen
dc.subjectstoaten
dc.subjectMustela ermineaen
dc.subjectbaiten
dc.subjectpalatabilityen
dc.subjectflavour additivesen
dc.titleDevelopment of a long-life bait for control of stoatsen
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300800 Environmental Science::300802 Wildlife and habitat managementen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Pest Management and Conservationen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/ECOL
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/PE20
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-7413-4704


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