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dc.contributor.authorBooth, Kay L.en
dc.contributor.authorDriver, B. L.en
dc.contributor.authorEspiner, Stephen R.en
dc.contributor.authorKappelle, Robert J.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-16T04:54:02Z
dc.date.issued2002-06en
dc.identifier.isbn0-478-22261-0en
dc.identifier.issn1175-6519en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1684
dc.description.abstractThis report discusses the Beneficial Outcomes Approach (BOA), and its suitability for implementation as a process by which the Department of Conservation (DOC) can better identify and prioritise social outcomes of New Zealand conservation management. The BOA emphasises achievement of positive social outcomes and avoidance of negative social outcomes - management of inputs and production of outputs are a means to achieve these ends. It requires clear, outcome-focused objectives and involves stakeholders in defining these objectives. It recognises the relevance of off-site consumers, as well as on-site users because it looks beyond site-specific management to the broad, societal role of public agencies. We present an overview and analysis of the BOA and international examples of its application before discussing how well the BOA fits with DOC management style and direction. Outcomes-focused initiatives consistent with the BOA exist within DOC. However, analysis and interviews with DOC staff indicate certain factors inconsistent with successful implementation of the BOA. These include: legislative and departmental ambiguity over DOC's role in visitor management; confusion over the lengths to which DOC should go to achieve desired management outcomes; narrow perceptions of DOC's social mandate; and the current emphasis on satisfying site-based users rather than the wider public. We recommend that DOC adopts the BOA, implementing it incrementally through a number of key pilot-test applications. Criteria for identifying and specifying personal, societal, economic and environmental outcomes are outlined. Further recommendations for successful implemention require DOC to: make explicit its target social outcomes and consider these in its decisionmaking processes; clarify its role in visitor management via development of recreation policy; broaden recreation planning beyond facility management; increase community/stakeholder involvement; maintain a cadre of well-trained recreational professionals and social analysts; and ensure training in BOA throughout the department.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis is a client report funded from the Conservation Services Levy (investigation no. 3251).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsCopyright © June 2002, New Zealand Department of Conservationen
dc.subjectbeneficial outcomes approachen
dc.subjectsocial outcomesen
dc.subjectconservation managementen
dc.subjectDepartment of Conservation (DOC)en
dc.titleManaging public conservation lands by the Beneficial Outcomes Approach with emphasis on social outcomesen
dc.typeReport
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300900 Land, Parks and Agriculture Management::300902 Land and parks managementen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Tourism, Sport and Societyen
pubs.confidentialfalseen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DTSS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3320-2632
lu.subtypeCommissioned Reporten


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