Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGerard, Sara F.
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-29T02:52:52Z
dc.date.available2010-04-29T02:52:52Z
dc.date.issued1984
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1769
dc.description.abstractA new alternative landuse, developed, and proven technically and economically feasible will create changes to the landscape. If the new landuse is widely accepted there will be widespread landscape changes – NEW LANDSCAPES. As a landuse, Agroforestry is relatively new in New Zealand. It can be defined as farming and forestry activities consciously combined vertically and/or temporally on the same piece of land. The development of this concept has been the result of changes within both the farming and forestry sectors. Over the last decade the Agroforestry concept has been developed through the investigation and implementation of the Forest-Farm system, by a team of scientists, from the New Zealand Forest Research Institute and Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. This Forest-Farm system, has alternative management options which involve the integration primarily of Pinus radiata, pasture, sheep and cattle. Woodstock, a joint Lands and Survey and New Zealand Forest Service project is being developed to investigate and demonstrate the Forest-Farm concept, as a commercial enterprise within Hawkes Bay. As a demonstration Agroforestry landscape, Woodstock will become a significant visual resource, expressing change in the fundamental landuse - landform relationship. Landmanagers, and the general community will respond to this change in accordance to their different needs and values. The Landscape Architect's role is to predict, compare and evaluate visual implications before implementation. There should be no excuse for unanticipated, illogical and incompatible surprises. There should be no reason for the different needs and values of the regions small grower, and community not to be satisfied. If the researched Agroforestry options available have limitations in fitting in requirements of both the site and people, then other options within the system will need to be investigated. Design opportunities need to be recognised within the Agroforestry system, so its management will produce a logical, harmoniously integrated landscape.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Canterburyen
dc.subjectagroforestryen
dc.subjectland useen
dc.subjectlandscapeen
dc.subjectfarm forestryen
dc.subjectagroforestry landscapeen
dc.subjectagrisilvicultureen
dc.subjectsilvopastoral systemsen
dc.subjectagrisilvopastoral systemsen
dc.subjectagroforestry system designen
dc.subjectlandscape architectureen
dc.titleAgroforestry : new landuse, new landscapesen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma of Landscape Architectureen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300600 Forestry Sciences::300606 Agroforestryen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300600 Forestry Sciences::300604 Management and environmenten
lu.thesis.supervisorSwaffield, Simon
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail
Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record