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dc.contributor.authorGrundy, T. P.
dc.date.accessioned2007-12-04T21:09:41Z
dc.date.available2007-12-04T21:09:41Z
dc.date.issued1989-11
dc.identifier.issn0113-4485
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/179
dc.description.abstractThis report presents the results of a cost-benefit analysis of biological control of hieracium. In South Island high country areas, species of the introduced hieracium genus are problem weeds. Mouse-ear hawkweed and king devil hawkweed are among two of the most abundant tussock grassland species in some areas of the South Island run country. These species exclude other plants and reduce feed availability, so causing a loss of agricultural production. They also exclude native grassland species and represent a threat to conservation values. The analytical framework presented provides a useful tool for further analysis of the assumptions used and the issues involved in biological control.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College. Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit.en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesResearch report (Lincoln College (University of Canterbury). Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit) ; no. 202en
dc.subjectbiological controlen
dc.subjectweed controlen
dc.subjectHieraciumen
dc.titleAn economic evaluation of biological control of hieraciumen
dc.typeMonographen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::340000 Economics::340200 Applied Economics::340201 Agricultural economicsen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten


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