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dc.contributor.authorMorton, J. D.
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-26T04:28:03Z
dc.date.available2010-05-26T04:28:03Z
dc.date.issued1989
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1950
dc.description.abstractInfection of barley (Hordeum vulgare) leaves with the rust fungus, Puccinia hordei, causes changes in the host protein synthesis. This thesis analyses these changes in the barley cultivar Triumph following inoculation of 7-day-old leaves with either a virulent or an avirulent race of P. hordei. The initial approach was to isolate membrane-bound polysomes from infected leaves, translate them in vitro and analyse the translation products. These products include the integral membrane proteins which were expected to be involved in the response of the host to the pathogen. A method based on differential centrifugation in the presence of a ribonuclease-inhibiting buffer was developed for separating membrane-bound polysomes from the rest of the cytoplasmic polysomes. Membrane-bound polysomes were found to comprise one fifth of the total polysomes in the leaves. Analysis of the translation products of membrane-bound polysomes by SDS-PAGE showed them to be of higher average molecular weight than those from free polysomes. Comparison of polypeptides produced by membrane-bound polysomes from healthy and inoculated plants showed some differences however the low yield of membrane-bound polysomes made it difficult to obtain conclusive results. Thus it was decided to isolate total polysomes by including 1% Triton X-100 in the extraction buffer. Polysomes were extracted from 12 to 72 h after inoculation. Infection caused a decline in yield of polysomes during this period when compared with healthy leaves of the same age. Polysomes isolated 16 h after inoculation with the virulent race were 20% less efficient at translation than polysomes from control leaves. In contrast polysome isolated from leaves inoculated with the avirulent race were 20% more efficient. Analysis of the labelled translation products by SDS-PAGE and fluorography showed relative increases in the synthesis of some proteins by 16 h after inoculation with either race when compared to products from healthy leaves. Protein synthesis in the infected plants was further analysed by in vivo labelling and one- and two-dimensional PAGE. The fluorographs revealed increased synthesis of a group of proteins from 58 to 116 kDa starting 12 h after inoculation with either race of P. hordei; confirming the results from the polysome translations. Two polypeptides with molecular weights of about 66 kDa were found to increase following infection only with the virulent race. By three days after inoculation with either fungal race the most obvious change in protein synthesis was a marked decrease in the synthesis of the two most prominent polypeptides with molecular weights of 15 and 51 kDa which were considered to be the subunits of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. The elicitor hypothesis, in attempting to explain cultivar-specific resistance in plants, postulates that resistance is controlled by the interaction of specific fungal elicitors and plant receptors and that this interaction which only occurs between resistant hosts and avirulent pathogens triggers specific gene expression leading to resistance. This hypothesis does not fit the situation in the barley-P. hordei interaction as protein synthesis showed similar changes following infection with either a virulent or an avirulent race.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectcerealsen
dc.subjectbarleyen
dc.subjectPuccinia hordeien
dc.subjectcultivar-specificen
dc.subjectdisease resistanceen
dc.subjectpolysomesen
dc.subjectproteinsen
dc.subjectmembrane-bounden
dc.subjecttranslationen
dc.subjecttwo-dimensionalen
dc.subjectelectrophoresisen
dc.subjectrubiscoen
dc.subjectplant pathogensen
dc.titleThe effect on protein synthesis in barley of infection with P. hordeien
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
lu.thesis.supervisorBarnes, Maurice
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc060704 Plant Pathologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc070308 Crop and Pasture Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)en
dc.subject.anzsrc060702 Plant Cell and Molecular Biologyen


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