Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPotts, Jason
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-28T03:04:35Z
dc.date.available2010-05-28T03:04:35Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1972
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the theoretical nature of an evolutionary microeconomics. The argument is made that there are two basic foundations upon which a system of microeconomics can be constructed. These are an integral space, which is associated with the neowalrasian framework, and a non-integral space, which is the domain of the heterodox schools. From this distinction, the first principles of the statics and dynamics of an evolutionary microeconomics are defined. This elevates the concept of complexity and the model of a complex system to the centre of this framework. Some applications toward multi-agent simulation modelling of evolutionary dynamics are sketched and methodological conclusions drawn. The main result is methodological and meta-theoretical. It is to show how all heterodox schools of thought can be connected to the theoretical framework of an evolutionary microeconomics. The re-interpretations that follow are set out in this thesis. I suggest a critical re-orientation of heterodox research toward the study of connections within the matrix of an economic system.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectevolutionary economicsen
dc.subjectontologyen
dc.subjectcomplex systems theoryen
dc.subjectgraph theoryen
dc.subjectGenetic Algorithmen
dc.subjectmulti-agent simulation modelsen
dc.subjectfield theoryen
dc.subjectschematic preferencesen
dc.subjectconnectionsen
dc.titleFirst principles of evolutionary microeconomicsen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
lu.thesis.supervisorDalziel, Paul
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Accounting, Economics and Financeen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en
dc.subject.anzsrc140104 Microeconomic Theoryen
dc.subject.anzsrc060304 Ethology and Sociobiologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc080110 Simulation and Modellingen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record