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dc.contributor.authorRegnier, C. E.
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-11T00:26:02Z
dc.date.available2010-06-11T00:26:02Z
dc.date.issued1983
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2035
dc.description.abstractThis study has considered some management aspects of New Zealand's wetland resource. An overview of past and present uses of some wetland types and possible trends illustrate attitudes toward wetland. The depleted status of the resource is stressed. The need for management of the complex and diverse wetland resource is seen as necessary. The ecological and economic perspectives discussed contribute to an understanding of wetland systems and the benefits derived from them. The ecological and social principles provide some important elements of policy for wetlands. Two features are emphasised. Firstly, the need to recognise wetlands as distinct ecosystems that include a diversity of types and provide a wide range of benefits. Secondly, the dynamic interactions of wetlands requires an integrated approach to management; within the watershed, and between local, regional, national and international levels of organisation. Existing policy relevant to wetlands is briefly reviewed. An analysis of present policy is based on the suggested elements of policy derived from the ecological and economic perspectives. The NWASCO Wetland Guidelines (1982) and the Land Settlement Board Policy (1983) apply specifically to wetlands. Elsewhere wetlands are only indirectly referred to. The Water and Soil Conservation Act, 1967, and the Town and Country Planning Act, 1977 have the potential to provide an important coordinating role over land, wetland, and water uses. Indirect reference to wetland management may leave policy open to interpretation. Difficulties may arise when implementing conflicting policy such as land development incentive and flood protection schemes. The study concludes that there is a need for a clearly stated national policy. Legislatively enforced guidelines may provide an important coordinating mechanism for the management of a complex resource. The wide range of benefit flows, both now and in the future may be better appreciated.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectwetland managementen
dc.subjectenvironmental managementen
dc.subjectecological perspectivesen
dc.subjecteconomic perspectivesen
dc.subjectenvironmental policyen
dc.subjectcomplex resource managementen
dc.subjectconflicten
dc.subjectdiversityen
dc.titleSome aspects of management for New Zealand wetlandsen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorHaywood, John
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050202 Conservation and Biodiversityen
dc.subject.anzsrc050209 Natural Resource Managementen


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