Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLucking, George W.
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-14T22:18:44Z
dc.date.available2010-06-14T22:18:44Z
dc.date.issued1985
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2067
dc.descriptionFor accompanying maps see Archive copy held in Library. Maps not available online.en
dc.description.abstractThe study has three broad aims. First, to establish that there is a need for more specific attention to be given to landscape values in the overall planning process - both by institutions and by individuals. Second, to develop a procedural model for the incorporation of landscape planning, design and management into the total planning process. Third, to demonstrate the application of that model in the context of the Lyttelton Harbour basin. The first two aims are examined in Part One and the third in Part Two. The present societal concern for the maintenance and enhancement of landscape values is reflected in planning legislation. In particular, the Town and Country Planning Act 1977 directs regional and district planning schemes to provide for the maintenance and enhancement of landscape values. However, practice as yet has not kept pace with the legislation and it is only now that the requirements are beginning to be met adequately. As a response to the need to give better direction to the existing legislative requirements for landscape protection and enhancement, a model for the incorporation of landscape planning design and management in the overall planning process is proposed. The model is a particular application of the general planning process involving preparation of brief, inventory, analysis and evaluation of inventory, identification and evaluation of options, development of preferred option and finally implementation. The model is then applied to Lyttelton Harbour basin, using a simple "reconnaissance" type inventory, to prepare an outline landscape plan. Four options for a landscape plan are examined, of which one is recommended for further study. The preferred option is considered to fulfil the requirements of the Act, to be practical and to give adequate direction to the maintenance and enhancement of landscape values. The study has highlighted three aspects of landscape protection and enhancement in New Zealand. First, greater attention to it is desirable for ecological, individual and societal wellbeing. Second, it is required by existing planning legislation. Third, landscape protection and enhancement is possible in practice, given adequate direction and public cooperation. It is now the task of those institutions and individuals whose responsibilities impact upon the visual values of the New Zealand landscape to ensure that adequate protection and enhancement is given to those values.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectlandscape planningen
dc.subjectlandscape valuesen
dc.subjectlandscape modellingen
dc.subjectLyttelton Harbouren
dc.subjectregional planningen
dc.subjectdistrict planningen
dc.titleLandscape planning design and management and case study of Lyttelton Harbour Basinen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorAckley, K. A.
lu.thesis.supervisorJackman, A. E.
lu.thesis.supervisorScott, G.
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc120505 Regional Analysis and Developmenten
dc.subject.anzsrc120504 Land Use and Environmental Planningen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail
Default Thumbnail
Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record