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dc.contributor.authorStallings David, A
dc.date.accessioned2007-12-13T23:05:50Z
dc.date.available2007-12-13T23:05:50Z
dc.date.issued1991-05
dc.identifier.issn1170-7682
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/214
dc.description.abstractThe strong appreciation of the U.S. Dollar between 1980 and 1985 induced a surge in imports into the United States for a wide variety of products. This, in turn, increased the demand for trade protection. Many of these demands were satisfied via U.S. antidumping and countervail regulations, yielding ad valorem tariffs well above current average duties. Import protection can benefit not only the protection-seeker, but also those who provide relief. A principal-agent model is developed that describes the potential gains to both the regulatory agency and the legislator. Empirical results support the model specification, finding both exchange rate and political cycles.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit.
dc.relationThe original publication is available from Lincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesResearch report (Lincoln University (Canterbury, N. Z.). Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit) ; no. 211
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAGMARDT series no. 1
dc.subjectprotectionism
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectforeign exchange
dc.subjectinternational trade
dc.titleAdministered protection in the United States during the 1980s : exchange rates and institutions
dc.typeOther
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::340000 Economics::340200 Applied Economics::340206 International economics and international finance
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Unit
pubs.publication-statusPublished
lu.subtype


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