Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWaterhouse, E. J.
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-12T03:25:39Z
dc.date.available2010-07-12T03:25:39Z
dc.date.issued1991
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2216
dc.description.abstractEcological restoration has been recognised worldwide as one of the most important conservation initiatives for the future. Despite this, the science of restoration is relatively new, and in a practical sense it has yet to gain widespread acceptance. Overseas restoration work has concentrated on pollution and mine site rehabilitation, while in New Zealand a more species orientated approach to restoration has prevailed. Ecological restoration represents an attempt to restore structural and functional aspects of ecosystems and communities which have been lost through human disturbance. The practical application of restoration relies heavily on the natural process of succession in establishing plant communities followed by animal introduction. However, there are a number of practical and theoretical problems with the concept of ecological restoration. They stem from an unclear statement of restoration goals, usually because of inadequate knowledge about past ecosystems, and an assumption that the techniques used will restore at a rate which exceeds natural regeneration. The New Zealand experience in ecological restoration began in the 1960s with the restoration of Cuvier Island. Since that time a number of projects have been attempted with varying degrees of success. The trends in ecological restoration are identified. These include: emphasis on island restoration, the expanding role of nongovernment organisations, and increasing levels of planning which reflect a rise in the ambitiousness of restoration goals. Critical issues can be identified which need to be addressed if ecological restoration is to be considered a legitimate and viable land use in the future. National policy and guidelines should be developed by a central coordinating agency which take account of the wider social and economic environment. Emphasis is given to the importance of community participation, effective land evaluation which takes long term restoration values into account and an accessible information base. An approach to developing a national strategy to achieve these objectives is suggested. Ecological restoration represents a significant step forward in the way in which humans view the world and its resources. Morally and ecologically, restoration will be essential in shifting the balance from destruction to enlargement of the planet's 'natural systems'.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectecological restorationen
dc.subjectconservationen
dc.subjectnative speciesen
dc.subjectecosystem recoveryen
dc.subjectcommunity participationen
dc.subjectecological valuesen
dc.subjectenvironmental awarenessen
dc.subjectenvironmental impacten
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleEcological restoration in New Zealanden
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorWard, Jonet
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc050206 Environmental Monitoringen
dc.subject.anzsrc050207 Environmental Rehabilitation (Excl. Bioremediation)en
dc.subject.anzsrc050102 Ecosystem Functionen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record