Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWashington Shelley, M.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-23T02:31:24Z
dc.date.issued2002en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2305
dc.description.abstractThe environmental issues we face today are caused by a historical conceptual separation of nature from culture. In Aotearoa New Zealand, and more specifically Christchurch and Canterbury, one of these issues is a depletion and degradation of indigenous vegetation. Ecological restoration has grown in popularity as a way to resolve this. The problem addressed in this research is that restoration has been conceptualised without sufficient consideration of important social and cultural dimensions. Ecological restoration has traditionally been framed as an ecological science phenomenon. This is a problem because ecological science studies of restoration are not sufficient given that restoration is carried out by people. This research aimed to find an understanding of the rise and meaning of ecological restoration activities in Christchurch and Canterbury by exploring what ecological restoration means for those involved. This exploration of meaning also provided insight into the aspects these people find satisfying and frustrating. The objectives of the research included: the consideration of the historical context of evolution of ideas and activities that have contributed to the plethora of restoration activity; to explore and describe the meaning of "doing" restoration on public and private land; to identify and discuss the discourses for restoration practitioners, experts, and researchers; and to explore the potential for ecological restoration to help restore the relationship between nature and culture. This thesis research uses a unique combination of theories - Human Ecology, Symbolic Interactionism and Discourse Theory. A qualitative methodology was used, with participant observation and semi-structured interviews. Twenty five people from eight restoration projects on public and private land were interviewed. Respondents ascribed different meanings to restoration; the five meaning discourses are named: "scientific", "habitat", "social", "humanist", and "holistic". At one end of the continuum, culture and nature are integrated quite well. At the other end, cultural and human dimensions can be completely left out of the discussion. A re-conceptualisation of ecological restoration to "eco-societal restoration' has potential to reframe how restoration is conceptualised and also to help heal the rift between culture and nature. People have different reasons for doing restoration such as restoring habitat for nature's sake, for future and present generations to enjoy, and in some cases, for economic benefit. Restoration is popular because it has significant meaning in people's lives, and it is largely satisfying and meaningful. This thesis research indicates that ecological restoration is a tangible, enjoyable way for people to help enhance indigenous biodiversity through recreating areas of indigenous habitat and natural areas for people to enjoy. The ultimate success of restoration projects depends on ongoing human commitment and participation. Such commitment is influenced by the level of meaning, satisfaction and achievement restoration can bring to people's lives.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjecthuman ecologyen
dc.subjectdiscourse theoryen
dc.subjectnatureen
dc.subjectcultureen
dc.subjectenvironmental managementen
dc.subjectenvironmenten
dc.subjectcommunityen
dc.subjectecological restorationen
dc.subjectChristchurchen
dc.subjectCanterburyen
dc.subjectsocialen
dc.subjectculturalen
dc.subjectdiscourse analysisen
dc.subjectsymbolic interactionismen
dc.subjectindigenous vegetationen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectpublic participationen
dc.titleRestoring what? : a socio-cultural exploration of ecological restoration in Christchurch and Canterburyen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Resource Studiesen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Tourism, Sport and Societyen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DTSS
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record