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dc.contributor.authorMacKay, B. J.
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-28T02:06:45Z
dc.date.available2010-07-28T02:06:45Z
dc.date.issued1981
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2324
dc.description.abstractThis thesis describes an exercise in curriculum evaluation of resident outdoor education programmes in New Zealand. It is the first known formal attempt to evaluate multiple outcomes of school camps in this country. Expected outcomes of resident outdoor education were determined through a survey of 80% of Christchurch schools. Outcomes selected for measurement were self concept, social skills and environmental attitudes. Evaluation of outcomes was conducted at three age levels, (10, 14 and 16 years) and two academic levels, (low and high ability). Established psychometric tests were employed, supplemented with questionnaires and observations. The reliability and validity of the tests were re-established and found to be adequate. Results suggest that actual outcomes were limited. The younger and low-ability groups appeared to be the most responsive to outdoor experiences. Statistically significant gains in self concept were observed among the 10 year age groups. In addition, one group of older, but low-ability students made a notable increase in their self concept score. In the area of social skill development, an improvement in teacher/student relationships was tentatively identified in a limited number of groups. Tests did not show improved relationships among classmates or in class cohesiveness, although further assessment of these intended outcomes may be warranted. No statistically significant gains in environmental attitudes were achieved by any experimental group. However, one low-ability group showed a significant decline in their wilderness attitude while the corresponding control group showed a significant increase in their outdoor attitude. Implications of the results for future development of outdoor education programmes in New Zealand are discussed. Possible reasons for the general failure of these camps to achieve intended outcomes and suggestions for improvement are offered. Two important points emerge from this study. The first is that the success of camps may partially depend on advance classroom preparation. The second is that environmental attitudes might be better promoted in the classroom than on school camps.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectoutdoor educationen
dc.subjectenvironmental attitudesen
dc.subjectsocial skill developmenten
dc.subjectschool campsen
dc.subjectpersonal developmenten
dc.subjectenvironmental educationen
dc.subjectevaluationen
dc.subjectassessmenten
dc.titleThe evaluation of outcomes of resident outdoor education : a study of selected Christchurch schoolsen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorScott, Graeme
lu.thesis.supervisorHayward, John
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.subject.anzsrc1399 Other Educationen
dc.subject.anzsrc050203 Environmental Education and Extensionen
dc.subject.anzsrc130303 Education Assessment and Evaluationen


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