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dc.contributor.authorHewett, Robert J.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-05T00:21:14Z
dc.date.issued1994en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2350
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the purchasing determinants affecting red meat in New Zealand. Particular emphasis is placed on disaggregating the attributes determining meat consumption, allowing a better understanding of the causal variables responsible for influencing meat demand. The study consists of both qualitative and quantitative research, with focus groups initially being conducted to form the basis of the quantitative research. Logistic regression analysis is conducted on the data to obtain the determinant variables for twelve commonly consumed red and white meat cuts. A segmentation study is also conducted, to ascertain if these variables are stable determinants of cut selection across different demographic segments. This study suggests that the most influential determinant attribute of meat consumption is convenience, with time-related variables the most important determinants governing red and white meat consumption. Although health concerns are stated as important by consumers, it seems that white meat consumption is increasing at the expense of red meat because it is better able to adapt to consumer's convenience demands.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectred meaten
dc.subjectwhite meaten
dc.subjectfocus groupsen
dc.subjectlogistic regression analysisen
dc.subjectdemographic segmentationen
dc.subjectconvenienceen
dc.subjectserviceen
dc.subjecthealthen
dc.subjectpriceen
dc.subjecttimeen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectconsumer preferenceen
dc.titleDisaggregating the purchasing determinants of red meat : attributes important in the consumer's red meat purchasing process : an analysis of twelve commonly purchased meat cuts and consumer segmentation studyen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Commerce and Managementen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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