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dc.contributor.authorMcNeill, Maria C.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-09T01:14:16Z
dc.date.issued2003en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2357
dc.description.abstractThe ‘baby boomers’ are now approaching their 'third age' with many people able to live fit, active, healthy lives well beyond that experienced by previous generations. The "third age" supposedly a time to take up new challenges, or explore new directions, has become possible through life span gains resulting from health and technological advances. For many who are approaching or now in their 'third age', however, the opportunity to continue working appears to be at risk. While it is now possible for 'third agers' to be active in the workforce up to and well beyond the previous retirement age, many older workers experience barriers to remaining in or returning to the workforce. This research, based on semi-structured interviews with eleven employers, identifies three main themes, that is 'perceptual', 'developmental' and 'cultural' barriers to 'third age' workforce participation. Each of these themes has developed around the changes that have occurred since many 'third agers' began work. At the same time employers are experiencing skill shortages that are predicted to continue and increase in the future. If employers are to maximise their potential workforce and meet the challenges of the ageing population, diversification of their workforce to include all ages will be necessary. As a second research objective, I reviewed the social policy in the area of ageing and unemployment and interviewed five social agencies who have responsibilities for the older unemployed. The document which has the main policy focus for older people, the New Zealand Positive Ageing Strategy is premised on ten positive ageing goals. These are income, health, housing, transport, ageing in place, cultural diversity, rural, attitudes, employment, and opportunities. Of these goals those that have the most importance for this thesis are income, attitudes and employment. Along with the consideration of social policy I interviewed social agencies as to their role in disseminating this policy to the unemployed. These agencies have a role to play in not only helping the mature unemployed to successfully return to the workforce but to also ensure that issues of demographic change and the 'third age' are known to the wider public especially to employers. It is important that employers are able to understand how these changes will affect their future workforce. One of the main issues for social agencies is that of continuing funding. This needs to be considered by government because currently many of these agencies spend a great deal of their time on funding issues which can mean that this is time lost to their clients. The other issue which needs to be considered here is that of providing the mature unemployed with choices at the outset of the loss of work. It has been shown by McGregor and Gray (2001) that the earlier the mature unemployed can return to work the more successful the outcome. It is important then that when older workers become unemployed that they are able to access information, as soon as possible, of all the agencies working on these issues that can offer them help. The Third Age Centre opened in Christchurch in 2001 can provide this information to the mature unemployed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectthird ageen
dc.subjectmature unemployeden
dc.subjectolder workersen
dc.subjectbarriers to participationen
dc.subjectperceptions and stereotypesen
dc.subjectadvantages and disadvantagesen
dc.subjectmedia imagesen
dc.subjectlife span developmenten
dc.subjectrole normsen
dc.subjectwork cultural changeen
dc.subjecttechnological changeen
dc.subjectpublic versus privateen
dc.subjectwork ethicsen
dc.subjectunemployablesen
dc.subjectundesirablesen
dc.subjectdemographic changeen
dc.subjectpositive ageingen
dc.subjectage discriminationen
dc.subjectretirement issuesen
dc.subjectout of stepen
dc.titleThe third age : barriers to employmenten
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Social Scienceen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/STARen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/STAR
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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