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dc.contributor.authorRooke, Beth Gina
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-16T03:33:34Z
dc.date.available2010-08-16T03:33:34Z
dc.date.issued1985
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2394
dc.description.abstractThe aims of this study are to explore the fundamentals of interpretation and to examine objectives for its implementation into urban areas. A survey of visitors to the Christchurch Botanic Gardens was undertaken to provide information for interpretive planning in urban and regional parks. Chapter two seeks to identify interpretation. It provides an overview of principles of interpretation. Chapter three examines the purposes of interpretation beginning with my personal goals and then discussing the fundamental issues. At this point some objectives and philosophies of interpretation are explored. Chapter four is directed at the question of interpretation in urban areas. The attitudes toward nature in cities are examined and, having developed a philosophy on nature in cities and urban areas, an example of the use of interpretation in urban areas is put forward. From this chapter a discussion on the basis for our responsibilities for interpretation is developed. Finally, an outline of the process of planning for interpretation is explained. Chapter five studies the use of research and its application toward interpretive planning. This chapter is the turning point in the study as it leads to a study of the Christchurch Botanic Gardens. Chapter six provides a background to the study of the Christchurch Botanic Gardens. It explains the selection criteria upon which the Gardens were chosen. Details on the location and brief history are included as are the aims of the Gardens. Chapter seven provides insight into the methodology used in undertaking the research. It begins with an outline of the types of data sought. The following sections divulge the constraints on research, the research period and the method by which the questionnaire was designed. Chapter eight provides the results of the survey of the Christchurch Botanic Gardens. Where possible the results are compared with those of Jolliffe's 1976 study and with society in general. The characteristics and motivations of visitors to the Gardens are examined and tabled. Interim summaries are provided on each section of the results. These include trip characteristics, visitor group characteristics, social characteristics, sources of information, facilities used and activities undertaken, and satisfactions. Finally, chapter nine concludes the study by providing an overview of the aims and findings of this dissertation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjecturban parksen
dc.subjectChristchurch Botanic Gardensen
dc.subjectinterpretive planningen
dc.subjectuser satisfactionen
dc.subjecttourist attractionen
dc.subjecttourist experienceen
dc.titleInterpretation for urban parksen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma in Parks and Recreationen
lu.thesis.supervisorTaylor, J. O.
lu.thesis.supervisorDevlin, P. J.
lu.thesis.supervisorSimmons, D. G.
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en
dc.subject.anzsrc1506 Tourismen
dc.subject.anzsrc1205 Urban and Regional Planningen
dc.subject.anzsrc150606 Tourist Behaviour and Visitor Experienceen


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