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dc.contributor.authorSymmes, G. W.
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-20T23:44:23Z
dc.date.available2010-09-20T23:44:23Z
dc.date.issued1982
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2566
dc.description.abstractKahikatea (Podocarpus dacrydioides) forests were once found extensively on alluvial plains and river flats throughout New Zealand. Today these forests have dwindled in extent; largely as a result of clearing of the fertile soils for pastoral farming and the use of the non-tainting timber for butter boxes. Kahikatea is still being used for many purposes despite the availability of suitable substitutes. The largest remaining areas of kahikatea are in South Westland, where they are protected by a Government-imposed moratorium on logging which expires in 1990. To protect these forests after that date and to establish ongoing reserves, two clear courses of action must be taken: the protection of these forests from logging, and the drawing up and implementing of a policy directed specifically at managing kahikatea in all stages and conditions of its development.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectlogging native speciesen
dc.subjectKahikateaen
dc.subjectDacrycarpus dacrydioidesen
dc.subjectnative woody speciesen
dc.subjectforestry conservationen
dc.subjectSouth Westlanden
dc.subjectPodocarpus dacrydioidesen
dc.titleKahikatea - Podocarpus dacrydioidesen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma of Natural Resourcesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc070504 Forestry Management and Environmenten
dc.subject.anzsrc050202 Conservation and Biodiversityen


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