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dc.contributor.authorFoster, Roland J.
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-21T20:41:15Z
dc.date.available2010-10-21T20:41:15Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2717
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation presents the results of an exploratory study of the ways boulderers have developed unique haptic skills during the practice of bouldering at Castle Hill/Kura Tawhiti, 100 km west of Christchurch, New Zealand. The research is grounded in phenomenology and ecological perception and takes as its starting points the importance of movement to perception, and that the whole body is necessarily involved in haptic perception. The research highlights the ways that boulderers cultivate particular skills of haptic perception that are related to the whole body, the hands and the feet, and elaborates the role of technology as a mediator between the feet and the rock. The study concludes that feet are as important as hands for haptic perception while climbing at Castle Hill/Kura Tawhiti.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectboulderingen
dc.subjecthaptic skillsen
dc.subjectrock climbingen
dc.subjectCastle Hillen
dc.subjectecological perceptionen
dc.subjectwhole bodyen
dc.title"It lets you use your feet more like you use your hands on the rock" : a haptic geography of boulderingen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorPerkins, Harvey
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.subject.anzsrc160402 Recreation, Leisure and Tourism Geographyen
dc.subject.anzsrc1604 Human Geographyen


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