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dc.contributor.authorRowe Sheilahen
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-03T21:21:29Z
dc.date.issued1996en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2748
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, zoos, including wildlife parks and aquariums, have focused upon conservation related research, public education and captive breeding in an effort Ito increase their participation in nature conservation. To encourage and guide these developments, a document entitled the World Zoo Conservation Strategy was produced in 1993 by two conservation minded organisations. The Strategy called upon the global collection of zoos to incorporate a series of tasks into their activities. It also emphasised that members of the public are key elements of the success of zoos in terms of maximising their conservation contributions. No previous studies have examined the degree to which New Zealand zoos have incorporated the recommendations of the Strategy have been conducted and little is known about the public's visiting behaviour and what people think of zoos in relation to their conservation activities. This meant that a national picture of conservation work undertaken at zoos was not available and individual zoos might have been failing to identify areas that are neglected or duplicated by other zoos. Further, an overview of the public's visiting patterns and perceptions towards zoos is needed if zoo managers are to enhance positive and alter negative perceptions and thus increase public support for zoos in this country. This research project was undertaken to determine the relationship between activities undertaken by the nation's zoos, the objectives of the World Zoo Conservation Strategy, public perceptions of the activities at zoos and the effects of public perceptions on visiting behaviour. A pilot study in the form of exploratory interviews was undertaken before two mail surveys were administered, one to zoo managers in New Zealand (n=16) and the other to members of the public (n=243). Results suggest that the zoos have been committed to high levels of participation in the activities outlined in the Strategy. Members of the public had positive perceptions of zoos' activities and agreed that zoos should be actively participating in conservation related tasks. Respondents indicated that they visited zoos because they sought out enjoyable activities or social interaction. Non-visitors indicated that they stayed away primarily because they lacked easy access to zoo. A series of recommendations are made that may aid zoo managers in attracting more visitors and further strengthening people's perceptions of zoos' conservation related activities.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectWorld Zoo Conservation Strategyen
dc.subjectperceptionsen
dc.subjectvisitorsen
dc.subjectzooen
dc.subjectwildlife parken
dc.subjectaquariumen
dc.titlePublic perceptions and conservation activities at New Zealand zoos, wildlife parks and aquariumsen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Resource Studiesen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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