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dc.contributor.authorBeare, Marty
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-25T03:06:28Z
dc.date.available2010-11-25T03:06:28Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2860
dc.description.abstractIncreasing numbers of individuals are training for careers as outdoor-adventure leaders. Decision-making training delivered by programmes of outdoor leadership is informed predominantly by classical decision theory. Students are taught to employ procedure-based rational-choice strategies as substitutes for experience-based judgement. A competing rhetoric that reflects the traditionally-held beliefs and practices of expert outdoor adventurers presents an alternative view. Instead of promoting structured training in rigorous procedures of evaluation and option selection, experts talk about the need to acquire a foundation of experience on which to base intuitively-made decisions. The traditional rhetoric has recently gained theoretical support from new research in decision-making based on real-world operational settings. Termed 'naturalistic decision-making', this approach is characterised by claims that experience-based judgement and recognition-driven decision-making methods can generate workable courses of action in dynamic problem-solving environments. Of all the naturalistic decision models, Klein's (1989, 1998) recognition-primed decision model is the most coherently expressed alternative to the rational-choice model of decision making. This study explores decision-making strategies used by expert mountaineers and kayakers in New Zealand, and investigates similarities with the recognition-primed decision model and with broader naturalistic decision making concepts. Conclusions reached are that the expert subjects do use recognitional strategies to make up their minds. Experts rely on knowledge and skill to interpret and assess what goes on in uncertain situations, and to devise short-term courses of action that remain relevant and effective within the overall goals of the occasion. Use of rational-choice strategies is limited to rare circumstances where simple choices occur in association with stable contexts. Implications of findings for outdoor-adventure practice, theory, and education are outlined, and future lines of inquiry are suggested.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectdecision makingen
dc.subjectjudgementen
dc.subjectexpertiseen
dc.subjectnaturalistic decision makingen
dc.subjectrecognition-primed decision makingen
dc.subjectrational choiceen
dc.subjectoutdoor adventureen
dc.subjectoutdoor leadershipen
dc.subjectsituation assessmenten
dc.subjectcritical reflectionen
dc.subjectmountaineeringen
dc.subjectkayakingen
dc.titleMaking up one's mind in the outdoors : decision making and the genesis of judgementen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorLynch, Pip
lu.thesis.supervisorMoore, Kevin
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.subject.anzsrc160402 Recreation, Leisure and Tourism Geographyen


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