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dc.contributor.authorPrince, Michael N.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-25T22:46:56Z
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2869
dc.description.abstractThis research project sets out to gain theoretical insights and develop an understanding of issues relevant to the livelihoods of families operating small sugarcane farms in Jamaica. The study started with the observation that small sugarcane operations in Jamaica were on the verge of collapse. This observation was based on the existing situation together with the fact that the preferential market price Jamaica received from the European Union for sugar would be reduced by 36 per cent in the 2009/2010 marketing year, and that these families would be severely affected. The primary aim was to identify strategies that can inform policy and planning relating to improving the livelihoods of these families in a sustainable manner. The case study strategy was chosen as the appropriate approach for carrying out the research. Two of the seven sugarcane growing regions in Jamaica were selected as case study sites. Philosophically, the study was conducted within the constructivist-interpretive research qualitative paradigm, together with principles drawn from grounded theory. The sustainable livelihoods approach formed the theoretical base and framework of analysis to guide the study. The study showed that two-thirds of the sampled families’ per capita income averaged $2.1 per day. They viewed themselves as poor. Even though sugarcane farming played an important role in the asset and activity dynamics of the families, it was factors other than sugarcane production that were responsible for achieving positive livelihood outcomes. Better off families with a per capita income that averaged $8.8 per day were able to participate in lucrative income generating activities more readily, than members of poor families, due to their higher education status. While formal sector employment characterised the better off families, informal and illegal activities were critical adaptive strategies for most of the poor.To improve the livelihoods of these families, evidence from the fieldwork revealed the need to tackle the elements of crime, invest in technical/vocational skill training and microenterprise development with particular attention given to non-sugarcane crops to provide an incentive and to boost on-farm earnings.en
dc.format.extent1-259en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectdevelopmenten
dc.subjectJamaicaen
dc.subjectfamiliesen
dc.subjectsmall sugarcane farmsen
dc.subjectcase studyen
dc.subjectlivelihoodsen
dc.titleInvestigating the livelihoods of families operating small sugarcane farms in Jamaica: A case study perspectiveen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerceen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Land Management and Systemsen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/LAMS
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.publisher.placeChristchurchen


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