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dc.contributor.authorMayer, Richard F.
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-06T20:28:20Z
dc.date.available2010-12-06T20:28:20Z
dc.date.issued1987
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2955
dc.description.abstractThe initial research topic for this dissertation began as an examination of the various drawing communication techniques and graphics that Landscape Architects use to communicate with the landscape construction industry. The objective was to expose ourselves to alternative means of communication as a step towards improving and broadening our communication skills within this Industry. After a series of personal interviews with those who use drawings produced by Landscape Architects, one thing was evident. This was that any problems the landscape construction industry was having with interpreting our drawings had to do more with the information itself rather than the techniques employed to communicate it. In particular, information that was either missing, inaccurate, or that contradicted the broader messages relating to the designers overall aims, goals and objectives. It appeared that problems in communication manifested themselves in what is commonly referred to as 'on site problems', or what I have called 'communication failure through landscape drawings'. Therefore it was felt that the interests of improving the communication skills of Landscape Architects and their relationship with the landscape construction industry would be best served by looking at some typical 'communication failures'. It was also felt that as a means of increasing our awareness of ourselves as communicators (and designers), Landscape Architects would benefit from a perception study, that answered the following questions: How do we as Landscape Architects feel about ourselves in terms of our abilities as communicators? How does the landscape construction industry feel about our abilities as communicators? Where do our strengths and weaknesses lie in communicating? This dissertation attempts to answer some of these questions and perhaps raise a few in the minds of Landscape Architects about the need for designers to interact more with the landscape construction industry. It is not a study of communication theory nor of social survey methods, it is simply an account of some of the types of 'on site problems' experienced by the survey groups and their perceptions. Data Significance It should be noted that all data presented and observations made in this study are done so only with respect to the questionnaire respondents. The size of the survey sample was not of a sufficient quantity to allow any conclusions or generalisations to be made on the part of individual groups or categories of Landscape Architects or Landscape Contractors. For example in the analysis of Landscape Architects under the work category of design-build there were a total of three respondents. Definitions For the purposes of this study the term 'Landscape Architect' (or L.A.) shall also refer to Landscape Designers, Landscape Gardeners and Landscape Technologists. The term 'Landscape Contractor' or 'contractor' shall refer to anyone who interprets drawings produced by a Landscape Architect for the purposes of cost estimating, construction and or fabrication of any work in or on the land. Study Bias It is acknowledged that the causes of all communication failure that occurs between Landscape Architects and Landscape Contractors does not rest solely with Landscape Architects This study however, focuses primarily on communication failure with respect to the Landscape Architect.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectlandscape architectureen
dc.subjectdrawing communication techniquesen
dc.subjectcommunication skillsen
dc.subjectlandscape construction industryen
dc.subjecton-site problemsen
dc.subjectcommunication failureen
dc.subjectarchitectural drawingen
dc.titleCommunication failure through landscape drawingsen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma of Landscape Architectureen
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc120107 Landscape Architectureen
dc.subject.anzsrc1203 Design Practice and Managementen


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