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dc.contributor.authorBrush Greg, J.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-08T20:25:59Z
dc.date.issued1995en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2975
dc.description.abstractParticipation in agrichemical training courses and awareness of the benefits of information on safe and efficient agrichemical use and management is ultimately dependant upon recognition of a need or a desire for such training on the part of the primary producer. However, despite the benefits that can accrue to primary producers from being trained in efficient and safe agrichemical use and management, the majority of primary producers undertake no formal agrichemical training. One reason often identified for the low level of primary producer agrichemical training participation is a perception, held by many primary producers, that agrichemical training is not cost effective. In addition to this reason there is also an erroneous belief, again held by many primary producers, that their current agrichemical practices are efficient and safe. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the influence on agrichemical training participation of two factors that have been identified as possible causes of the low level of primary producer agrichemical training participation: (i) The cost effectiveness of training. (ii) Primary producer' uncertainty about efficient and safe agrichemical use and management practices. In order to achieve this objective the research was conducted in two phases. In the first phase a cost-benefit analysis of agrichemical training for New Zealand growers was undertaken. The second phase of the research then examined the factors that "trigger" New Zealand primary producers' recognition of a problem in their use and management of agrichemicals. In order to develop a model that examines the dimensions that influence problem recognition, a comprehensive data set on New Zealand primary producers' attitudes, information, behaviour and current situation is factor analysed to identify the underlying dimensions in the data. A logistic regression model is then estimated in order to evaluate the effects of these dimensions on problem recognition. The results from the cost-benefit analysis indicate that agrichemical training participation is cost effective for a significant percentage of primary producers. The findings of the empirical analysis suggest that employee involvement and safe use and export factors are positively associated with problem recognition. Conversely, the factors representing experience, health ambivalence and overconfidence are significantly negatively associated with problem recognition.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectproblem recognitionen
dc.subjectdecision makingen
dc.subjectagrichemical practicesen
dc.subjectworkplace trainingen
dc.subjectagrichemical educationen
dc.subjecteconomic aspectsen
dc.subjecthazardous substancesen
dc.subjecthealth risksen
dc.subjectattitudesen
dc.titleFactors influencing problem recognition in an environment of uncertaintyen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Commerce and Managementen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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