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dc.contributor.authorWarren, Daniel P.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-09T20:11:35Z
dc.date.issued1998en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2990
dc.description.abstractCycling is an environmentally sustainable transport mode. It is also healthy, economical, and socially beneficial. This research examined cycling as a means of transportation to work, with the aim of identifying appropriate initiatives to promote bicycle commuting. Data gathered from 334 employees at nine Christchurch workplaces and census data were used to identify the characteristics of the bicycle commuter and to predict and explain bicycle commuting behaviour, using Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behaviour. The primary intention was to apply this widely accepted theory to a practical setting, rather than to contribute to theory development. An information and education campaign promoting bicycle commuting was implemented at four of the workplaces to determine its effectiveness at changing behaviour, intention or beliefs toward cycling to work. Other objectives of the research were to establish a rationale to explain the variation in bicycle commuting participation between workplaces and to gather information on employee perceptions of useful bicycle commuting initiatives. It was found that bicycle commuters tended to be young males. Weaker relationships were also found between bicycle commuting behaviour and other demographic variables. Multinomial logit analysis showed the Theory of Planned Behaviour to be effective in predicting bicycle commuting behaviour. Perceived behavioural control over bicycle commuting, and attitudes, particularly beliefs concerning the convenience and safety of cycling to work, were identified as the most important predictors of bicycle commuting behaviour. One-way ANCOV As showed the bicycle commuting information and education campaign was ineffective in changing levels of cycling at the participating workplaces, and t-tests demonstrated that the manipulation was also unable to alter the subjects' attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control or intention toward cycling to work. The research was unable to establish a clear rationale to account for the variance in bicycle commuting participation between the workplaces, although cycling to work was more popular at the government organisations. It could be concluded from the research that information and education campaigns were not likely to be sufficient to increase bicycle commuting participation. More integrated transport policies, attention to cyclists' safety issues, cycling convenience improvements through government and workplace initiatives, and strategies that make bicycle commuting more accessible are recommended as ways to improve bicycle commuting participation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectbicycle commutingen
dc.subjectcommuting to worken
dc.subjectplanned behaviouren
dc.subjectattitudesen
dc.subjectbeliefsen
dc.subjectcyclingen
dc.titleImproving bicycle commuting participationen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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