Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSkerten Roseen
dc.contributor.authorWilson Kerry Jayneen
dc.contributor.authorOgilvie Shaun, C.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-16T00:41:56Z
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.issn1177-6242en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/3047
dc.description.abstractThe kererū (Hemiphaga noveaseelandiae) are New Zealand's native woodpigeon. The ability of kererū to inhabit fragmented native forest, their characteristic iridescent plumage and distinct noise when in flight, make them a well known and loved native bird. As with the vast majority of New Zealand‟s indigenous species, the population of kererū has declined significantly since the arrival of people and the foreign mammals they bought with them, approximately 1200 years ago. Currently, kererū are listed as in gradual decline and are categorised as of “least concern” under the IUCN Red List. However, kererū are of utmost concern to the ecological restoration of New Zealand‟s native forests as they are probably the sole disperser of large fruiting native plants. In recent years a number of kererū conservation projects throughout New Zealand have been established. One such initiative, is the Kaupapa Kererū project. Kaupapa Kererū is a collaborative, iwi-lead project, which aims to increase the numbers and range of kererū on Banks Peninsula by working with the community to raise awareness and appreciation for kererū, and also by researching kererū ecology."en
dc.format.extent1-29en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Bio-Protection & Ecology Divisionen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Bio-Protection & Ecology Division - http://hdl.handle.net/10182/3047en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLincoln University Wildlife Management Reporten
dc.subjectOrton Bradley Parken
dc.subjectcatsen
dc.subjectkererū (Hemiphaga noveaseelandiae)en
dc.subjectKererū countsen
dc.subjectwoodpigeonen
dc.subjectpesticides and wildlifeen
dc.titleMonitoring Kererū population size and investigating the relationship between cats and Kererū at Church Bay and Orton Bradley Park, Banks Peninsulaen
dc.typeMonograph
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitPest-Management and Conservationen
dc.subject.anzsrc0602 Ecologyen
pubs.editionNo. 45en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/ECOL
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10182/3047en
dc.publisher.placeLincoln, Canterburyen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record