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dc.contributor.authorLaws, G. R.
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-19T01:27:23Z
dc.date.available2011-05-19T01:27:23Z
dc.date.issued1978
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/3553
dc.description.abstractVirtually no urban areas in New Zealand have "just grown" in regard to the layout of streets and allotments. From very early days legislation has empowered Local Authorities to control some aspects of subdivisional layout. The extent to which subdivisional development for urban purposes is controlled at present comprises (with very few exceptions) that all subdivisions must be approved by the territorial local authority. In granting approval the local authority has power to control: the location of roads; the size, dimensions and shape of allotments; the reservation of areas for service lanes, accessways, future roads, drains and other facilities; and a wide range of other matters. These controls have tended to standarise development right throughout the country with little significant variation. Another major factor affecting this pattern of development is the system of land titles, housing finance and home ownership in New Zealand. A common practice is the purchase of an allotment of bare land followed by provision of a house through a system of individual mortgage finance and engagement of a building contractor. "Spec" housing does not differ greatly in character or general principle from this system. Recently, increased public interest and awareness in environmental matters has also resulted in expression of disillusionment with the overall standard of amenity found in urban and particularly residential areas. Whilst recognising the influence of other factors, it is contended that present planning controls - zoning, subdivision and bulk and location ordinances, and roading standards - do not always assist in producing attractive residential environments. The aim of this study, therefore, is to assess the functional and visual effects of planning controls on the environment of a residential suburb and to consider alternative patterns of development that may provide more convenient and attractive living conditions for its inhabitants. In order to realise this objective an existing residential subdivision in Christchurch was selected for assessment and study. Concepts of town planning and the development of legislation leading up to the specific controls for the chosen site were first considered. The effects of these controls as observed in this subdivision were then assessed, followed by discussion including reference to various alternative development practices. Finally an alternative development proposal is presented to demonstrate some of the techniques and concepts arising from this study.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectsubdivisionen
dc.subjectcity planningen
dc.subjectresidential expansionen
dc.subjectresidential subdivisionen
dc.subjectplanning controlsen
dc.subjectresidential environmentsen
dc.titlePlanning controls in a residential subdivisionen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma of Landscape Architectureen
lu.thesis.supervisorBennett, Earl
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc120107 Landscape Architectureen
dc.subject.anzsrc120507 Urban Analysis and Developmenten
dc.subject.anzsrc1205 Urban and Regional Planningen


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