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dc.contributor.authorBlumhardt, K. M.
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-03T01:39:00Z
dc.date.available2011-06-03T01:39:00Z
dc.date.issued1979
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/3597
dc.description.abstractOff-road vehicle recreation (ORVR) can be defined as the use of any type of-motorized vehicle for active recreational purposes on land not generally suited to conventional vehicles due to the nature of the terrain. North American studies identify several types of off-road vehicle (ORV) as being involved in ORVR, including: motorcycles, four-wheel drive vehicles (4WD's), dune buggies, snow mobiles, all-terrain vehicles, camper-trucks and hovercraft; however, this study will concentrate on the most common types in New Zealand (motorcycles, four-wheel drives and dune buggies). ORVR has made extensive and far-reaching technological advances during the last 15 years, yet our ability to adapt and provide for this activity, which is here to stay, regardless of any 'energy crisis', is not at all evident. The critics of ORVR are many and vocal, yet very few satisfactory alternatives have been proposed or established. This dissertation will study the ORV phenomenon from both the demand upon the physical environment and the participants' point of view. The history of ORVR in New Zealand and overseas will be reviewed and the types of vehicles used and how they are used will be examined. Characteristics of user groups; who are ORV users and why they are involved with the activity will be examined. Clubs and organized groups will be commented on and compared with non-club activity. Landscape types sought after and the environmental impact on ORVIS will be reviewed and legislation and constraints in this field will be noted. The conflict of recreation styles which can occur and the responses of industry and other groups will be mentioned and alternatives will be examined. Comparisons will be made with overseas experiences. Recommendations will be made and it is intended that this dissertation may be of benefit to ORV users, local authorities and ad hoc bodies in Canterbury regarding adequate environmentally acceptable provisions for this legitimate recreation activity.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectoff-road vehiclesen
dc.subjectrecreationen
dc.subjectCanterburyen
dc.subjectfour wheel drivesen
dc.subjectenvironmental impacten
dc.subjectuser-group conflictsen
dc.titleOff-Road vehicle recreation: the characteristics, demands and impacts on the physical and social environment with specific reference to Canterburyen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma in Parks and Recreationen
lu.thesis.supervisorTaylor, Allison
lu.thesis.supervisorDevlin, Pat
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc160402 Recreation, Leisure and Tourism Geographyen


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