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dc.contributor.authorDalziel, Paul
dc.contributor.authorMaclean, Gillis
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Caroline
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-09T02:05:15Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/3614
dc.description.abstractIn 2002, the New Zealand government identified three sectors that would be the focus of public policy under its Growth and Innovation Framework. One of these three sectors was the creative industries, selected on the basis that ‘the creative industries can leverage New Zealand’s unique culture and as a knowledge based sector, it has the potential to generate wealth on a sustained basis and reposition New Zealand as a nation of new ideas and new thinking’. Also in 2002, New Zealand reformed its Local Government Act so that one of the two purposes of local government is to promote the social, economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities, in the present and for the future. This paper draws on New Zealand’s experiences under these policies to examine the links between economic policy and cultural well-being, highlighting the underlying principle that the use of cultural capital for economic benefit may damage cultural well-being if the cultural capital is not kept connected to its cultural context.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis paper was sponsored by the Tokyo Club Corporation, Waseda University. The authors are very grateful to the President of the Japan Society for New Zealand Studies, Profesor Michio Yamaoka, for his kind invitation to present this paper at the symposium. The presenter, Professor Paul Dalziel, is grateful to the hosts and sponsor, and to Lincoln University, for financial support to participate.
dc.format.extentpp.1-21
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit
dc.relationThe original publication is available from Lincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit - http://hdl.handle.net/10182/3614
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Financial and Business Systems
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors.
dc.subjectmulti-disciplinary
dc.subjectwell-being
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjecteconomic policy
dc.subjecteconomic reforms
dc.subjectenvironmental aspects
dc.subjectsocial cultural capital
dc.subjectsustainable development
dc.titleEconomic policy and cultural well-being: the New Zealand experience
dc.typeOther
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Unit
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Global Value Chains and Trade
dc.subject.anzsrc140201 Agricultural Economics
pubs.notesThis paper was originally an invited presentation to an International Symposium on The Roles of New Zealand and Japan in the Asia-Pacific: From Standpoints of Security, Economy and Cultural Exchange, Waseda University, Tokyo, 14-15 September, 2008. The symposium was hosted by the Japan Society for New Zealand Studies, co-hosted by the Research Group of Economic Education, the Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies and Waseda University.
pubs.organisational-group|LU
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce|GVCT
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Research Management Office|QE18
pubs.place-of-publicationLincoln, Canterbury
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10182/3614
dc.publisher.placeLincoln, Canterbury
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-1757-6888
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-7810-8167
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-6394-4947


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