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dc.contributor.authorAhumada, Pablo E.en
dc.date.accessioned2008-03-19T04:19:18Z
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/365
dc.description.abstractHow does material production become socially recognised in capitalism? This is a fundamental question to be addressed in capitalist production, since material production takes place privately and independently in a global and atomistic system. This thesis shows that the question is tackled by Marx in the first three chapters of Capital. The process of social recognition of material production is that of the realisation of work carried out privately and independently as part of the social labour. For Marx this occurs through the private and independent work becoming objective social labour as the substance of the value of commodities, and through the latter finding its necessary developed mercantile expression in the price form of commodities. Therefore, private and independent work becomes social labour through the recognition of its product as equivalent to a certain amount of money. The thesis argues that Marx's answer is powerfully insightful but flawed because it did not succeed in fully characterising the historical specificity of commodity. Commodity is not merely the differentiated unity of use value and value but of use value and mercantile use value, and of labour value and mercantile value. The former dialectic is immediate and distinguishes between the utility of commodity as a direct means of consumption or production and that as a means of exchange, fully determining the behaviour of the private and independent commodity producer. The latter dialectic is objective and distinguishes between commodity as the embodiment of the social labour necessary to reproduce it and as the embodiment of command over social labour, enabling the adjustment of the productive structure. Both dialectics are mediated by the mercantile form of value, which allows the indirect expression of labour value as the gravitational force of the system. The theory of commodity offered in this thesis, unlike that of Marx, consistently hinges on the atomistic private and independent commodity producer. The thesis shows that commodity production is the organisation of society's labour for its material reproduction, just as in any previous mode of production. The discovery of the generic aspect of commodity production breaks the false immediate link between production and supply, and that between the labour theory of value and both the supply-side-determined theory of price and the single-factor theory of production. The thesis also shows that the mercantile form of value is what allows society's labour to become an objective and autonomous materially abstract substance regulating the adjustment of the productive system under the form of material signals. This is the specific aspect of a global mode of production comprised of free and independent individuals. The mercantile form of value is thus Adam Smith's invisible hand. Finally, the thesis analyses some implications of the framework with regard to the analysis of monetary phenomena, capital accumulation and sustainable development, and reviews the most popular Marxian topic in Economics: the transformation of values into prices of production.en
dc.format.extent1-111en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectcommodityen
dc.subjectmoneyen
dc.subjectform of valueen
dc.subjectexchange valueen
dc.subjectlabour valueen
dc.subjectmercantile valueen
dc.subjectuse valueen
dc.subjectmercantile use valueen
dc.subjectcomparative advantageen
dc.subjectMarxen
dc.subjectmaterial productionen
dc.subjectinvisible handen
dc.subjectdialecticen
dc.titleThe theoretical relevance of an updated Marxian theory of commodity in economicsen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Commerce and Managementen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::340000 Economics::340100 Economic Theoryen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerceen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/ECONFINen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/ECONFIN
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.publisher.placeChristchurchen


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