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dc.contributor.authorRussell, Adrian C.
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-03T22:13:38Z
dc.date.available2011-08-03T22:13:38Z
dc.date.issued1996
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/3754
dc.description.abstractLentils are one of the earliest cultivated crops in the world. Archeological investigation has shown that they have been grown since the early stone age. World production of lentils is currently around 2.8 million tons, produced on 3.3 million ha (FAO, 1996). Lentil production commenced in Canterbury New Zealand in 1982 with the release of a small red cotyledoned lentil cultivar named 'Titore', by the Department for Scientific and Industrial Research (DSIR), Crop Research Division. This followed a decade of extensive research on this crop by DSIR and Lincoln College to identify suitable germplasm for production, and the agronomic factors which influence the growth and development of lentils. During the 1985/86 growing season ascochyta blight, (caused by the fungus Ascochyta fabae f. sp. lentis), (AFL) was widespread in lentil crops in Canterbury. Many harvested seed-lines contained discoloured and shrivelled seed (Russell, unpublished data). The area of lentils sown in New Zealand has declined rapidly in recent years as the cost of controlling ascochyta blight combined with a lower international price for lentils has forced Canterbury farmers to plant other legume crops such as field peas, which are perceived to be less risky (Wilson, pers. comm.). In response to the demand for lentil cultivars with resistance to AFL, the New Zealand Institute for Crop & Food Research Limited (C&FR) initiated an industry-funded lentil breeding programme at Lincoln. An objective of the breeding programme is to incorporate resistance to ascochyta blight into commercially acceptable cultivars for the New Zealand arable industry, and for commercial evaluation in international markets. The plant breeding activities of C&FR are increasingly being focused on producing new lentil cultivars for international markets because of the limited potential in New Zealand to earn significant royalty income from new lentil cultivars.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectlentilsen
dc.subjectAscochyta fabaeen
dc.subjectdisease resistanceen
dc.subjectplant breedingen
dc.subjectLens culinaris Medik.en
dc.titleIdentification of Lentil (Lens culinaris) germplasm with resistance to ascochyta blight caused by Ascochyta fabae f. sp. Lentis in New Zealanden
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.namePostgraduate Diploma in Agricultural Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorHill, George
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
dc.rights.accessRightsThis digital dissertation can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en
dc.subject.anzsrc070305 Crop and Pasture Improvement (Selection and Breeding)en
dc.subject.anzsrc070302 Agronomyen


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