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dc.contributor.authorCherry, Neil J.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-07T04:17:35Z
dc.date.issued2001-08-29en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/3919
dc.description.abstractDr Neil Cherry was asked by a school in Florida, United States, to review of biological and epidemiological health effects of electromagnetic fields, especially for children with the proposed to have a substation constructed next to the school with high-voltage powerlines coming in. this review shows are many sally showing an extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields reduced melatonin, enhance chromosome aberrations, damaged DNA strains and increase rates of cancer electrical and electronic workers, and children and adults in residential situations both from powerlines and from the fields in their own homes. Because we almost all live in homes with electric energy that means for the electronic fields which enhance the background cancer rate so that there is no not exposed group to be used as a reference group for epidemiological studies. Therefore the published studies significantly underestimate the relative risks levels. Very few people realize how many health effects of hourly rates from this background fields we live in. By taking all this information together it has concluded that the applied guideline/standard should be 1mG. Because many people live in fields above the 1mG guideline and the state level is zero, it is recommended to take the New Zealand Ministry of Environment approach to reduce exposures below the guideline. When actual exposures are less than the guideline they should be maintained and reduced to be “good”, below 33% (0.33mG) or “Excellent”, below 10% (0.1mG). This approach would significantly improve the public health effects, not only from cancer, but also for cardiac, neurological and reproductive health effects, all of which had been associated with exposure to these fields with doseresponse relationships pointing down to zero exposure.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Human Sciences Department.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Human Sciences Department.en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author.en
dc.subjectelectromagnetic fieldsen
dc.subjecthealth effectsen
dc.subjecthigh voltage powerlinesen
dc.subjectextremely low frequency (ELF)en
dc.subjectcanceren
dc.subjectElectromagnetic Frequency (EMF)en
dc.titleEvidence that electromagnetic fields from high voltage powerlines and in buildings, are hazardous to human health, especially to young children.en
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
pubs.notesDr Neil Cherry, (1946-2003) held the position of Associate Professor of Environmental Health at Lincoln University, and had a professional scientific background in physics, biophysics, meteorology, Agricultural and Human Biometeorology, renewable energy, energy efficiency and environmental epidemiology.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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