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dc.contributor.authorCherry, Neil J.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-20T03:34:56Z
dc.date.issued2001-08en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/3934
dc.description.abstractSince the first evidence that RF radiation damages chromosomes in 1959, many independent studies have identified broken DNA stands, chromosome aberrations and altered gene expression in animal cells, human cells and in living animals and humans from EMR exposure. This confirms that RF/MW radiation is genotoxic with a safe exposure level of zero. Scores of epidemiological studies show that EMR increases brain tumors, including 16 studies with dose-response relationships and at least six specifically identifying astrocytomas. Exposure to RF/MW is consistently associated with headaches, fatigue, loss of concentration and memory loss. These symptoms have been called "The Radiofrequency Sickness Syndrome" or "Microwave Syndrome". These symptoms are now shown with cell phone use in a significant dose-response manner. Cellphone use has also been associated with increases brain tumor in 4 studies and eye cancer in one study. Police traffic radar is also shown to be genotoxic through studies associating it with increases testicular cancer. This is a consistent and coherent set of studies confirming that microwaves, radar and police radar is genotoxic and when exposing an officer's head over many months, will produce a significantly increased risk of producing an Astrocytoma brain tumor. All of these effects occur for exposures well within existing standards. The standards are based on tissue heating and ignore the evidence of genotoxicity, cancer and neurological effects.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Human Sciences Department.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Human Sciences Department.en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author.en
dc.subjectpolice radaren
dc.subjectRadiofrequency Sickness Syndromeen
dc.subjectMicrowave Syndromeen
dc.subjectbrain canceren
dc.subjectpulsed microwavesen
dc.subjectElectromagnetic Radiation (EMR)en
dc.subjectDNA damageen
dc.subjectgenotoxicityen
dc.titleEvidence of brain cancer from occupational exposure to pulsed microwaves from a police radar.en
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
pubs.notesDr Neil Cherry, (1946-2003) held the position of Associate Professor of Environmental Health at Lincoln University, and had a professional scientific background in physics, biophysics, meteorology, Agricultural and Human Biometeorology, renewable energy, energy efficiency and environmental epidemiology.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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