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dc.contributor.authorCherry, Neil J.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-21T03:13:59Z
dc.date.issued2002-09-19en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/3947
dc.description.abstractThere is sensible scientific evidence to establish a trail of connection from the sun activity to human biological and health effects. This explains why sunspot numbers and indices of Geomagnetic Activity are correlated with serious human health effects in a large body of published studies. The key element is the role of the Schumann Resonance signal that is detected by human brains and is used to synchronize diurnal and ELF brain rhythms. The Schumann Resonance signal intensity is modulated and highly correlated with solar activity and the electron concentrations in the lowest layers of the ionosphere. The enhanced or weakened solar activity moves the level of the SR signal outside the normal homeostatic range and, through the Melatonin mechanism, causes health problems and enhanced death rates in large human populations. A five-year monthly data-base is used to confirm the correlation between the climatic factors of sunspot number, Geomagnetic Indices, Southern Oscillation Index and Global mean temperature anomalies with the SR signal strength. The Sunspot Number emerges as the strongest factor. A 19 year data-set of annual mortality rates in SE Asia is used to seek evidence of correlations between human mortality rates and the sunspot number in order to support and confirm the SR hypothesis. A wide range of mortalities that are associated with Melatonin reduction, are found to be significantly correlated with sunspot number, including cancer, cardiac and neurological mortality.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Human Sciences Department.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Human Sciences Department.en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author.en
dc.subjectMelatoninen
dc.subjectsunspotsen
dc.subjectThailanden
dc.subjecthuman health effectsen
dc.subjectSolar-Geomagnetic Activity (S-GMA)en
dc.subjectSchumann Resonanceen
dc.titleSchumann Resonance and sunspot relations to human health effects in Thailanden
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
pubs.notesDr Neil Cherry, (1946-2003) held the position of Associate Professor of Environmental Health at Lincoln University, and had a professional scientific background in physics, biophysics, meteorology, Agricultural and Human Biometeorology, renewable energy, energy efficiency and environmental epidemiology.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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