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dc.contributor.authorCullen, Rossen
dc.contributor.authorTakatsuka, Yukien
dc.contributor.authorWilson, M.en
dc.contributor.authorWratten, Stephen D.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-25T23:11:08Z
dc.date.issued2004-06en
dc.identifier.issn1170-7607en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/3960
dc.description.abstractResearchers have estimated the total economic value of global ecosystem goods and services showing that a significant portion of humanity's economic well being is unaccounted for in conventional GNP accounting (Constanza et al., 1997). To demonstrate this point, authors have conventionally used highly aggregated landscape units for analysis (e.g., biomes), and average, not marginal values, of each ecosystem good or service are estimated for each unit using value transfer methodologies (Wilson et al., 2004). For example, Patterson and Cole (1999a, b) replicated the Constanza et al., (1997) approach by estimating economic values for Waikato and New Zealand ecosystem goods and services associated with standard land cover classes including horticulture, agriculture and cropping. As a result, Patterson and Cole (1999b) argue that only five ecosystem services associated with cropping have non-zero value. One of the reasons for this low number of non-zero values assorted with arable lands is that the original economic studies used by Patterson and Cole, are heavily weighted towards natural and undisturbed ecosystems rather than disturbed systems like agricultural or urban landscapes. To address this issue, more recently researchers have noted that many landscapes are actively modified by humans who seek to realise economic gain and this topic is thus an important one because in the 21st century, many of our homes, workplaces and recreational spaces are embedded within, or adjacent to, landscape mosaics that are to a greater or lesser degree affected by the conscious efforts of people to harness goods and services provided by ecological systems (Palmer et al., 2004). An engineered or designed ecosystem is one that has been extensively modified by humans to explicitly provide a set of ecosystem goods and services including more fresh water, trees, and food products and fewer floods and pollutants. These modified landscapes provide a range of ecosystem goods and services, particularly food production as farmers seek to maximize commercial gain from land use. The current paper examines issues in valuation of ecosystem goods and services derived from land used for arable farming in New Zealand and proposes ways to provide more detailed estimates of the flow and value of the flow of ecosystem services provided.en
dc.format.extent84-90en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Societyen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Societyen
dc.rightsCopyright by author(s). Readers may make copies of this document for non-commercial purposes only, provided that this copyright notice appears on all such copies.en
dc.sourceProceedings of the 10th Annual Conference of the New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society (Inc.)en
dc.subjectengineered ecosystemsen
dc.subjectecosystem managementen
dc.subjectarable farmingen
dc.titleEcosystem services on New Zealand arable farmsen
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitBio-Protection Research Centreen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerceen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Financial and Business Systemsen
dc.subject.anzsrc070108 Sustainable Agricultural Developmenten
dc.subject.anzsrc0502 Environmental Science and Managementen
pubs.finish-date2004-06-26en
pubs.notesPaper presented at the 2004 New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society (Inc.) Conference, Blenheim Country Hotel, Blenheim, New Zealand, June 25-26, 2004.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/BPRC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/FABS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.start-date2004-06-25en
pubs.volume151en
dc.publisher.placeAERU, Lincoln Universityen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-5168-8277
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


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