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dc.contributor.authorCherry Neil, J.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-03T03:41:05Z
dc.date.issued1999-07en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4001
dc.description.abstractBreast cancer is a serious problem for women and also a risk for men. In assessing the risk of breast cancer associated with exposure to electromagnetic fields and radiation (EMF & EMR) this review approaches the problem primarily from the whole-body point of view. Our minds control many body functions through the central nervous system and through mediating a wide range of hormones. This includes melatonin, which is a highly potent free radical scavenger. Hence melatonin protects cells from cancer and it strengthens the immune system. EMR is shown to influence the brain, reduce the output of key hormones (e.g. Melatonin and Thyrotropin), and to impair the immune system. Thus EMR is carcinogenic. Alteration of cellular calcium ions is a well-established biological effect of EMR exposure. Calcium ion influx is associated with the survival of damaged cells, and thus increases cancer risk. Calcium ion efflux is associated with enhanced cell death (apoptosis) of damaged cells, and hence enhances neurodegenerative diseases. Calcium ion efflux is also related to impairment of the immune system, and to alteration of reaction times and brain EEG rhythms. German research has proven that human brains detect and use the Schumann Resonances (SR) for timing synchronization. Altering the intensity and frequency of the SR changes human reaction times and circadian rhythms. A large body of research shows that there is an optimal intensity of SR, with increases and decreases in natural EMR being associated with a wide range of adverse neurological and cardiac health effects, and breast cancer. This research proves that sensitive and vulnerable human beings are made ill and can die when the natural EMR changes. The mean ELF intensity level of the SR is about 0.1 pW/cm2. This is 2 billion times lower than internationally recommended public health guidelines for ELF exposure. Cell line and animal exposure experiments, and epidemiological studies of populations who are occupationally and residentially exposed to EMR reveal significant hormonal, neurological, cardiac and cancer effects. A series of laboratory experiments involving breast cancer prone rats exposed to 50/60Hz exposure down to 0.1μT EMF, produced dose response relationships with the size and number of mammary tumors, with melatonin reduction and with reduced T lymphocytes. They also show a significant increase in proto oncogene activity. Occupational and residential studies of human populations show significant increases in breast cancer across the EMR spectrum, especially for premenopausal women and for positive estrogen receptor breast cancer. Since cell phones pose a very high risk it is recommended that all EMR exposures, especially cell phone exposure, be minimized.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Human Sciences Departmenten
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Human Sciences Departmenten
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author.en
dc.subjectcanceren
dc.subjectbreast canceren
dc.subjectElectromagnetic Radiation (EMR)en
dc.subjectElectromagnetic Frequency (EMF)en
dc.titleElectromagnetic radiation causes cancer: the implications for breast canceren
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
pubs.notesDr Neil Cherry, (1946-2003) held the position of Associate Professor of Environmental Health at Lincoln University, and had a professional scientific background in physics, biophysics, meteorology, Agricultural and Human Biometeorology, renewable energy, energy efficiency and environmental epidemiology., A Research paper presented at the World Conference on Breast Cancer Ottawa, Canada, 26-31 July 1999.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


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