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dc.contributor.authorCherry, Neil J.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-09T04:04:29Z
dc.date.issued2002-06en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4011
dc.description.abstractMotor Neurone Disease (MND) is a progressive disease and once the symptoms are jointly evident enough to allow diagnosis, MND is a rapidly terminal disease. A plausible mechanism is the enhanced Apoptosis of the Motor Neurones leading to the loss of skeletal muscular control and strength. This has led to the development of a hypothesis that attempts to explain the overall evidence pattern, including the seasonal MND related birth peak in Spring, the familial and occupational MND associations. The hypothesis proposes that the development of MND is based on a variable initial volume of Motor Neurons and the development of the disease through the enhanced cumulative Apoptosis rates over people’s life-time, leading to premature loss of the Motor Neuron muscular control and premature death primarily through lung failure. The cumulative life-time damage from exposure to environmental neurotoxins, stressful activity that reduces sleep quality and melatonin, heavy work load periods, antioxidant levels in diets, are a complex set of factors that can enhance the Motor Neurone Apoptosis rate. This is connected to the lack of CNS neuron regeneration. The associated environmental neurotoxin effects include those from heavy metals, smoking, agricultural chemicals, water and air pollution toxic chemicals and genotoxic electromagnetic fields. The ubiquitous nature of any associated substance, especially dioxin and electromagnetic fields, suggests that they are the largest general population risk factor. Electromagnetic fields and some toxic chemicals have been found to pass cancer on to children from mother and/or father’s exposures. This supports a genotoxic mechanism that is supported by many studies showing chromosome damage and DNA strand breakage. These disease agents are likely to reduce the initial Motor Neuron Volume and/or advance the rate of development of Motor Neuron Disease through enhanced Apoptosis rates. Reducing the general population's exposure to environmental and residential genotoxic and neurotoxic substances is likely to be associated with a significant reduction in the incidence of MND in future generations.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Human Sciences Departmenten
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Human Sciences Departmenten
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authoren
dc.subjectelectromagnetic fieldsen
dc.subjectMotor Neuron Diseaseen
dc.subjectenvironmental health factorsen
dc.subjectenvironmental neurotoxinsen
dc.subjectgenotoxicityen
dc.subjectapoptosisen
dc.titleEnvironmental health factors for motor neuron diseaseen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
pubs.notesDr Neil Cherry, (1946-2003) held the position of Associate Professor of Environmental Health at Lincoln University, and had a professional scientific background in physics, biophysics, meteorology, Agricultural and Human Biometeorology, renewable energy, energy efficiency and environmental epidemiology.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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