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dc.contributor.authorCherry, Neil J.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-13T23:15:45Z
dc.date.issued2001-05-07en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4012
dc.description.abstractThousands of people are using cell phones for hours each day. They are exposing a very sensitive organ, their brain, to higher mean intensities than military personnel are exposed to when repairing radar. The military personnel show significant increases in cancer and a wide range of illnesses. Even at the very low mean levels that people experience living within 10 km of radio and TV towers, significant increases in cancer has been observed. Analogue cell phones emit an analogue modulated RF/MW signal similar to an FM radio or TV signal. The digital cell phones radiate a pulse RF/MW signal similar to radar. Biological and epidemiological effects from EMR exposure across the spectrum show the same or similar effects. Many people continue to drive while talking on their cell phones. Attention deficit and neurological effects on the user's brain make accidents much more likely. Very young children and teenagers are becoming regular to heavy users of cell phones while their brains and bodies are in a much more vulnerable state than elderly people. With cancer and neurodegenerative disease latencies of decades, the possible adverse effects will take some time to become evident. By which time it will be too late for thousands of people. There is growing concern about cell phone interference with cardiac pacemakers. If cell phone signals can interfere with an electronic pacemaker, then it is likely to also interfere with human hearts that are arrhythmically unstable.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Human Sciences Department.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Human Sciences Department.en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author.en
dc.subjecthealth risksen
dc.subjectbrainen
dc.subjectcell phone radiationen
dc.subjectbiological risken
dc.subjectcanceren
dc.subjectElectromagnetic Radiation (EMR)en
dc.subjecthuman health effectsen
dc.titleCell phone radiation poses a serious biological and health risk:en
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
pubs.notesDr Neil Cherry, (1946-2003) held the position of Associate Professor of Environmental Health at Lincoln University, and had a professional scientific background in physics, biophysics, meteorology, Agricultural and Human Biometeorology, renewable energy, energy efficiency and environmental epidemiology.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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