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dc.contributor.authorRyan, P. A.
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-15T22:06:43Z
dc.date.available2011-11-15T22:06:43Z
dc.date.issued1971
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4026
dc.description.abstractTemperature is one of the most important factors affecting the growth and activities of any organism, and those organisms which can exist and reproduce in high temperature environments are of considerable importance. Although a few examples of thermophilic organisms occur among the more specialised taxonomic groups – fungi, nematodes, insects and molluscs, - thermophily is most common among unicellular organisms. Different definitions are used for thermophily in bacteria, fungi and animals. A maximum growth rate at temperatures above 45°c is mainly characteristic of prokaryotic organisms. Only a few species of eukaryotic protists or animals can tolerate temperatures above 45°c.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectthermophilic microorganismsen
dc.subjectthermophilyen
dc.subjecttemperatureen
dc.subjectbacteriophagesen
dc.subjectBacillus stearothermophilus T16en
dc.subjectthermal inactivationen
dc.subjectthermophilic bacteriaen
dc.titleSome properties of the thermophilic bacteriophage D6en
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciencesen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. If you are the author of this item, please contact us if you wish to discuss making the full text publicly available.en
dc.subject.anzsrc060504 Microbial Ecologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc060501 Bacteriologyen


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