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dc.contributor.authorCherry, Neil J.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-07T00:36:37Z
dc.date.issued2002-08en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4098
dc.description.abstractDr Cherry was invited in June 2000 by a group of European Parliament MPs to present evidence at a European Parliament Conference to show if there was any evidence that electromagnetic radiation was genotoxic, and if there was any epidemiological evidence showing what exposure levels could be safe. Dr Cherry was surprised to find many studies showing that electromagnetic radiation is genotoxic, including several isothermal studies and several with dose-response relationships. He also found many epidemiological studies showing dose-response relationships for cancer, cardiac, reproductive and neurological effects, showing a safe level of zero exposure, consistent with EMF/EMR being genotoxic.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Human Sciences Department.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Human Sciences Department.en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author.en
dc.subjectepidemiologyen
dc.subjectcanceren
dc.subjectcardiac effectsen
dc.subjectneurological effectsen
dc.subjectreproductive effectsen
dc.subjectElectromagnetic Radiation (EMR)en
dc.subjectgenotoxicityen
dc.subjecthuman health effectsen
dc.titleEvidence that electromagnetic radiation is genotoxic: the implications for the epidemiology of cancer and cardiac, neurological and reproductive effectsen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
pubs.notesDr Neil Cherry, (1946-2003) held the position of Associate Professor of Environmental Health at Lincoln University, and had a professional scientific background in physics, biophysics, meteorology, Agricultural and Human Biometeorology, renewable energy, energy efficiency and environmental epidemiology. Later version of the paper titled ‘Evidence that electromagnetic radiation is genotoxic: the implications for the epidemiology of cancer and cardiac, neurological and reproductive effects’en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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