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dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Caroline M.en
dc.contributor.authorWreford, Anita B.en
dc.date.accessioned2008-03-31T21:03:17Z
dc.date.issued2003-08en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/413
dc.description.abstractThis paper focuses on the impact of mitigating greenhouse gases (GHG) on agricultural trade. In particular, the paper assesses the impact on New Zealand (NZ), which is highly reliant on agricultural trade, with a high percentage of its total GHG emissions are originating in the agricultural sector. The paper also analyses the impact of mitigation strategies in the European Union (EU), which has a low proportion of GHG coming from agriculture, a highly protected agriculture sector, and is a major market and competitor for NZ. Results from a partial equilibrium trade model, the LTEM, show clearly that while these mitigation strategies achieve the goal of GHG reduction, producer returns are also negatively affected. The value of these changes in emissions are then calculated, based on US$15/tonne of carbon dioxide (CO₂), and producer returns adjusted for this. Although this value of CO₂ goes some way towards offsetting the reduction in producer returns, it would need to be considerably greater in order to provide any significant compensation.en
dc.format.extent1-15en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit - http://hdl.handle.net/10182/413en
dc.rightsCopyright 2003 by Saunders and Wreford. All rights reserved. Readers may make verbatim copies of this document for non-commercial purposes by any means, provided that this copyright notice appears on all such copies.en
dc.source25th International Conference of Agricultural Economistsen
dc.subjectagricultural production systemen
dc.subjectgreenhouse gas emissionsen
dc.subjectpartial equilibrium trade modelen
dc.titleMitigation of greenhouse gas emissions : the impacts on a developed country highly dependent on agricultureen
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::340000 Economics::340200 Applied Economics::340201 Agricultural economicsen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::340000 Economics::340200 Applied Economics::340202 Environment and resource economicsen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
dc.subject.anzsrc140201 Agricultural Economicsen
pubs.finish-date2003-08-22en
pubs.notesContributed paper selected for presentation at the 25th International Conference of Agricultural Economists, 16-22 August 2003, Durban, South Africa.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/PE20
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10182/413en
pubs.start-date2003-08-16en
dc.publisher.placeLincoln, Canterburyen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-6394-4947
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-9546-4080
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


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