Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFalloon, Richard E.en
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T20:38:57Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T20:38:57Z
dc.date.issued1972
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4337
dc.description.abstractIn this study of bacteriostatic agents used in sheep dips, the results of earlier relevant work were first reviewed. The literature relating to the microbiology of fleece wool, the chemicals that have been used in the control of arthropod ectoparasites of sheep, and the micro-organisms of the fleece that cause problems with plunge sheep dipping, and the in vitro methods of testing the sensitivity of bacteria to chemicals was studied. The seven bacteriostatic compounds selected for study were: lauryldimethylbenzylammonium chloride, a mixture of alkyl-, tolyl-, and methyl- trimethylammonium chlorides, 2-hydroxypropylmethanethiosulphonate, 4-chloro-2-cyclopentylphenol, 2,2'-dihydroxy-3,5,6, 3',5',6'-hexachlorodiphenylmethane, 3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide, and an arsenical preparation containing sodium arsenite. They were evaluated against the following indicator organisms; Escherichia coli (Migula) Castellani and Chalmers 1919, a sulphur reducing strain of E. coli Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Schroeter) Migula 1919, Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (Migula) Buchanan 1918, and Dermatophilus congolensis van Saceghem 1915, emend. 1916, 1934. The laboratory methods used to assess the activity of the compounds were; a broth dilution turbidimetric and agar subculture technique, an agar diffusion technique, a manometric technique, and a gradient plate procedure. A field trial was undertaken to relate the laboratory results to the practical sheep dipping situation. The quaternary ammonium compounds tested showed the greatest antibacterial activity, and their use as dip bacteriostats can be recommended. All the other compounds, except 3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide, have possible applications for the control of specific microbiological problems of sheep dipping or in fleece wool. Some observations are made concerning the phenomenon of hormesis as shown in agar diffusion plates. Comparisons have been drawn between the methods used in this study and assessment of their value has been made. An agar diffusion method is suggested as a standard test for sheep dip bacteriostatic agents. Finally some recommendations for further research work have been made.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectectoparasitesen
dc.subjectbacteriostatic agentsen
dc.subjectbacteriostatsen
dc.subjectsheep dipsen
dc.subjectantibacterial activityen
dc.subjectchemical controlen
dc.subjectfleece woolen
dc.subjectagar diffusionen
dc.subjectpH changesen
dc.subjectenzyme activityen
dc.subjectrespiratory responseen
dc.subjectantibiotic susceptibilityen
dc.subjectmetabolic responseen
dc.subjectmicro-organismsen
dc.titleStudies on sheep dip bacteriostatic agentsen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Agricultural Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorMulcock, A. P.
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc060502 Infectious Agentsen
dc.subject.anzsrc060501 Bacteriologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc060101 Analytical Biochemistryen
dc.subject.anzsrc0605 Microbiologyen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail
Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record