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dc.contributor.authorSherlock, Robert R.en
dc.contributor.authorSommer, S. G.en
dc.contributor.authorKhan, R. Z.en
dc.contributor.authorWood, C. W.en
dc.contributor.authorGuertal, E. A.en
dc.contributor.authorFreney, J. R.en
dc.contributor.authorDawson, Christopher O.en
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Keith C.en
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-14T03:20:09Z
dc.date.issued2002en
dc.identifier.citationSherlock, R. R., Sommer, S. G., Khan, R. Z., Wood, C. W., Guertal, E. A., Freney, J. R., et al. (2002). Ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide emission from pig slurry applied to a pasture in New Zealand. Journal of Environmental Quality, 31(5), 1491-1501.en
dc.identifier.issn0047-2425en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/435
dc.description.abstractMuch animal manure is being applied to small land areas close to animal confinements, resulting in environmental degradation. This paper reports a study on the emissions of ammonia (NH₃), methane (CH₄), and nitrous oxide (N₂O) from a pasture during a 90-d period after pig slurry application (60 m³ ha⁻¹) to the soil surface. The pig slurry contained 6.1 kg total N m⁻³, 4.2 kg of total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN = NH₃ + NH₄) m⁻³, and 22.1 kg C m⁻³, and had a pH of 8.14. Ammonia was lost at a fast rate immediately after slurry application (4.7 kg N ha⁻¹ h⁻¹), when the pH and TAN concentration of the surface soil were high, but the loss rate declined quickly thereafter. Total NH₃ losses from the treated pasture were 57 kg N ha⁻¹ (22.5% of the TAN applied). Methane emission was highest (39.6 g C ha⁻¹ h⁻¹) immediately after application, as dissolved CH₄ was released from the slurry. Emissions then continued at a low rate for approximately 7 d, presumably due to metabolism of volatile fatty acids in the anaerobic slurry–treated soil. The net CH₄ emission was 1052 g C ha⁻¹ (0.08% of the carbon applied). Nitrous oxide emission was low for the first 14 d after slurry application, then showed emission peaks of 7.5 g N ha⁻¹ h⁻¹ on Day 25 and 15.8 g N ha⁻¹ h⁻¹ on Day 67, and decline depending on rainfall and nitrate (NO₃) concentrations. Emission finally reached background levels after approximately 90 d. Nitrous oxide emission was 7.6 kg N ha⁻¹ (2.1% of the N applied). It is apparent that of the two major greenhouse gases measured in this study, N₂O is by far the more important tropospheric pollutant.en
dc.format.extent1491-1501en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of Americaen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America - https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2002.1491en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2002.1491en
dc.rightsCopyright © 2002 American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of Americaen
dc.subjectemissionsen
dc.subjectammoniaen
dc.subjectmethaneen
dc.subjectnitrous oxideen
dc.subjectpig slurryen
dc.subjectAgronomy & Agricultureen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshSwineen
dc.subject.meshManureen
dc.subject.meshSoilen
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutantsen
dc.subject.meshRefuse Disposalen
dc.subject.meshVolatilizationen
dc.subject.meshAgricultureen
dc.titleAmmonia, methane, and nitrous oxide emission from pig slurry applied to a pasture in New Zealanden
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300100 Soil and Water Sciencesen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300800 Environmental Scienceen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Soil and Physical Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciencesen
dc.identifier.doi10.2134/jeq2002.1491en
dc.subject.anzsrc04 Earth Sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc05 Environmental Sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc06 Biological Sciencesen
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Environmental Qualityen
pubs.issue5en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/SOILS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/WFMB
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.volume31en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-7631-1636


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