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dc.contributor.authorThornton, S. J.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-26T20:27:24Z
dc.date.available2012-03-26T20:27:24Z
dc.date.issued1984
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4381
dc.description.abstractIn New Zealand, as elsewhere, decision makers are currently faced with the option of abandoning the present strategy of leaded petrol in favour of the unleaded petrol alternative. There are three considerations that are relevant to this decision. The first is the nature and certainty of the evidence for the effects that lead from petrol may have on the health of young children. The second involves the financial costs of a change to the unleaded petrol option. The third involves the evaluative framework the analytic method through which complex decisions of this kind can be approached. It is argued that the scientific literature, generally, supports the view that lead, even at low concentrations, represents a danger to child health. It is argued, also, that lead from petrol is a substantial contributing factor to the normally found elevated body lead levels in New Zealand children and, thus, that there exists a link between leaded petrol and damage to child health. Available estimates of the monetary penalties associated with a move to unleaded petrol indicate that the cost is likely to be relatively small, if the transition is conducted efficiently. Economics and ethics are examined as evaluative frameworks within the context of the lead in petrol decision-problem. Normative economics, in the form of cost benefit analysis, was found to be not particularly well suited to this decision-problem. However, given appears that unleaded petrol is certain assumptions, it the economically superior alternative. From the perspective of ethics, analytic moral philosophy suggests that the continued use of leaded petrol is ethically indefensible. Thus, it is concluded that a move ought to be made to the unleaded petrol option.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectunleaded petrolen
dc.subjecthealth effectsen
dc.subjectfinancial costsen
dc.subjectdecision makingen
dc.subjectchild healthen
dc.subjecteconomicsen
dc.subjectethicsen
dc.titleEvaluating unleaded petrolen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorScott, Graeme
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en
dc.subject.anzsrc111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safetyen
dc.subject.anzsrc140205 Environment and Resource Economicsen


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