Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHamlin, Michael J.en
dc.contributor.authorAinslie, P. N.en
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-03T02:49:13Z
dc.date.issued2010-06en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4434
dc.description.abstractAcute mountain sickness (AMS) is a debilitating health problem that affects a number of subjects when ascending to high altitude. Symptoms can include headache, nausea, lethargy, fatigue and subsequent loss of sleep and performance, however if susceptible subjects could be identified early precautionary measures could be put in place to reduce or eliminate AMS. The aim of this study was to determine if physiological variables measured at sea level could predict AMS (as measured by the Lake Louise score) at real altitude. A series of physiological measures were taken at rest at sea level (Dunedin, New Zealand) and again at 5050m (Pyramid Research Laboratory, Nepal). Measures included oxyhaemoglobin saturation, haematocrit, haemoglobin concentration, blood pressure, heart rate, cerebral blood flow and a number of ventilatory measures. We found that sea-level cerebral blood flow (R = 0.47), and haematocrit (R= -0.50) were strongly correlated with AMS, however using multiple linear regression results indicated that sea-level mean blood pressure was the only statistically significant predictor of AMS at altitude (p < 0.01). This analysis indicated that sea-level mean blood pressure accounted for 45% of the prediction of AMS at altitude. In conclusion, while sea-level mean blood pressure is a useful predictor of AMS at altitude, clearly other factors account for the remaining 55% of AMS at altitude, and further research is required to uncover these remaining factors.en
dc.format.extent1-18en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Faculty of Environment, Society and Design. Department of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism & Sporten
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Faculty of Environment, Society and Design. Department of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism & Sport - http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4434en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Tourism, Sport and Societyen
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors.en
dc.subjectAcute Mountain Sickness (AMS)en
dc.subjectsports healthen
dc.subjectrespiratory measurementsen
dc.subjectAMS symptomsen
dc.subjectaltitude sicknessen
dc.subjectphysiological aspectsen
dc.titlePrediction of acute mountain sickness and sleep apnea in subjects travelling to and training at altitudeen
dc.typeMonograph
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Tourism, Sport and Societyen
lu.contributor.unitResearch Management Officeen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff groupen
dc.subject.anzsrc1106 Human Movement and Sports Scienceen
pubs.notesThe aim of the study was to determine if the symptoms of acute mountain sickness and the development of sleep apnea while breathing low levels of oxygen at sea-level can predict the extent of these symptoms at high altitude.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DTSS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff group
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10182/4434en
dc.publisher.placeLincoln, Canterburyen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-7941-8554


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record