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dc.contributor.authorJackson, Nicola
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-14T23:39:25Z
dc.date.available2012-05-14T23:39:25Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4457
dc.description.abstractThe Resource Management Act 1991 requires councils to maintain and enhance amenity values. However, there has been little guidance to help councils identify the amenity values they are meant to maintain and enhance. The Ministry for the Environment and the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment have attempted to address amenity values, but have not provided guidance on how to define and identify amenity values. The definition of amenity values in the Act is very broad and has various meanings and interpretations. It is a complex concept best described through the identification of composite elements. Describing the elements of amenity values allows distinct emphasis to be placed on the element itself. This makes policy writing more specific as it focuses on the individual elements or combination of elements. Thus, protecting amenity values overall through the protection of individual elements. This report addresses this gap using an interdisciplinary approach. In particular, landscape theory and assessment procedures are considered within the fields of landscape architecture, perception and aesthetics. Landscape perception theory has shown how perception of the living environment is influenced by biological, social and cultural, and personal factors. The theories behind how we perceive our surroundings have direct implications for the approaches used to assess landscape quality and to identify amenity values. Landscape assessment procedures involve a number of approaches and techniques which are suitable in different circumstances. The investigation into landscape perception and assessment has resulted in the formulation of a framework to aid councils in identifying amenity values in a specified area. The framework emphasises the importance of local community involvement and the range of techniques available for councils to use in this identification process. It is important for councils to select the methods appropriate for their context and circumstance.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectResource Management Act 1991en
dc.subjectamenity valuesen
dc.subjectIntegrated Environmental Management (IEM)en
dc.subjectlocal governmenten
dc.subjectenvironmental perceptionen
dc.subjectenvironmental assessmenten
dc.subjectlandscape preferencesen
dc.subjectenvironmental lawen
dc.subjectlandscape perception theoryen
dc.subjectlandscape aestheticsen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleToward a framework for identifying amenity values under the Resource Management Act 1991 : a report submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science (Resource Management) at Lincoln Universityen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorRixecker, Stefanie
lu.thesis.supervisorSwaffield, Simon
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050104 Landscape Ecologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc120107 Landscape Architectureen


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