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dc.contributor.authorLorca, Vilmaen
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-25T01:23:53Z
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4488
dc.description.abstractThe growing recognition of the importance of forests in the environment led many developed (donor) countries around the globe to provide aid or grants to developing countries for forest development projects. However, the sustainability of these forest development projects often faces uncertainty. A common problem is conflict of interests between the state, private companies and indigenous peoples, particularly in relation to land rights. Traditional aid was oriented towards neoliberal development (commercialization) which depended to a large extent on individual property rights and this can conflict with indigenous people’s customary land ownership and non-commercial use of forests. The Bukidnon forestry project in the Philippines involves, a government owned or controlled corporation assisted by the New Zealand government, establishing a demonstration commercial re-forestation project with commercial production plantation forestry. The Bukidnon Forests Incorporated (BFI) is the corporation established by the Philippines and New Zealand to achieve this goal. However, since its establishment indigenous peoples’ claims to forest land access and ownership has strengthened. This study has explored the challenges facing Bukidnon Forests Incorporated (BFI) and Ancestral Domain/Ancestral Land (AD/AL) claimants as they endeavour to achieve their respective goals. It has also looked at the concerns, needs and interests of BFI and AD/AL claimants purposely to find mutually beneficial arrangements for both parties once BFI’s current land rights expires in 2016. The results of the study indicated that successful establishment and development of a man-made forest plantation is possible in once-denuded and marginalized grassland in the Philippines. However, the government style in managing commercial forest plantation is ineffective in terms of attaining its commercial viability; the long-term sustainability of the project is also uncertain primarily because of insecure land ownership and tenure rights. Moreover, the concept of establishing a large scale industrial tree plantation is in conflict with the objectives of AD/AL claimants in terms of how their ancestral land are being developed. However, alternative institutional arrangements may offer mutually beneficial solution for both BFI and AD/AL claimants.en
dc.format.extent1-125en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectprivatisationen
dc.subjectNZAIDen
dc.subjectPhilippinesen
dc.subjectancestral landen
dc.subjectindustrial tree plantationen
dc.subjectsustainabilityen
dc.subjectAncestral Domain/Ancestral Land claimantsen
dc.subjectinstitutional arrangementsen
dc.subjectland ownershipen
dc.subjecttenure rightsen
dc.titleChallenges in integrating indigenous and state interests to advance sustainable use of forest resources: The case of the Bukidnon forestry project, Philippinesen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
pubs.notesOpen Access version - data removed from Figure 20 (p. 67), Table 24 (p. 70), Figure 21 (p. 71), Table 26 (p. 79), Appendix A, at the request of the Author.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.publisher.placeChristchurchen


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