Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWaring, Scot Michael
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-13T22:38:57Z
dc.date.available2012-06-13T22:38:57Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4534
dc.description.abstractInvasive species can significantly impact native food webs through indirect effects. Examples of apparent competition typically involve a non-native consumer disproportionately affecting one host population in the presence of another. My research finds evidence for apparent competition between two herbs, one invasive and one endemic, and mediated by an endemic insect herbivore. The European pasture herb Jacobaea vulgaris (formerly Senecio jacobaea), is an invasive weed in several parts of the world, including New Zealand. New Zealand is also home to 19 native species of Senecio – thirteen of which are endemic – that support an endemic insect fauna. Some of these insects have since expanded their host range to include the invasive J. vulgaris. I examined the relationships between one of those herbivores, the New Zealand magpie moth (Nyctemera annulata, Lepidoptera: Arctiidae), J. vulgaris and one endemic (S. wairauensis) and two native host plants (S. minimus and S. quadridentatus). In my laboratory assays, magpie moth larvae found J. vulgaris as attractive as native host plants and larvae fed only J. vulgaris developed at comparable rates to those fed only native hosts. My landscape surveys revealed a strong association between J. vulgaris infestations, magpie moth abundance and increased levels of herbivore damage of the endemic S. wairauensis. Likewise, S. wairauensis was more likely to be present in transects where J. vulgaris was rare. There is convincing anecdotal evidence that the native magpie moth became far more abundant because of an invasive weed and my study suggests that this detrimentally affects native plants through population spillback.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectapparent competitionen
dc.subjectindirect effectsen
dc.subjectinvasiveen
dc.subjectenemy releaseen
dc.subjectJacobaea vulgarisen
dc.subjectSenecioen
dc.subjectSenecio minimusen
dc.subjectSenecio quadridentatusen
dc.subjectSenecio wairauensisen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectNyctemera annulataen
dc.subjectmagpie mothen
dc.titleApparent competition between native and exotic plants mediated by a native insect herbivore : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Lincoln Universityen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
lu.thesis.supervisorSullivan, Jon J.
lu.contributor.unitBio-Protection Research Centreen
dc.subject.anzsrc0602 Ecologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc050103 Invasive Species Ecologyen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record